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Who invented the elevator?

Who invented the elevator?


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Although elevators may seem like a modern invention, devices used to transport people or goods vertically have been around for thousands of years. According to the writings of Vitruvius, the Greek mathematician Archimedes created a primitive elevator in 236 B.C. that was operated by hoisting ropes wound around a drum and rotated by manpower applied to a capstan. In ancient Rome, a subterranean complex of rooms, animal pens and tunnels stood beneath the Colosseum. At various intervals, elevators powered by hundreds of men using winches and counterweights brought gladiators and large animals up through vertical shafts into the arena for battle.

In 1743, Louis XV had what was referred to as a “flying chair” built to allow one of his mistresses to access her quarters on the third floor of the Palace of Versailles. Similarly, a “flying table” in his retreat château de Choisy allowed the king and his private guests to dine without intrusion from the servants. At the sound of a bell, a table would rise from the kitchen below into the dining room with an elaborate meal, including all of the necessary accoutrements.

By the mid-19th century, elevators powered by steam or water were available for sale, but the ropes they relied upon could be worn out or destroyed and were not, therefore, generally trusted for passenger travel. However, in 1852, Elisha Graves Otis invented a safety break that revolutionized the vertical transport industry. In the event that an elevator’s hoisting rope broke, a spring would operate pawls on the car, forcing them into position with racks at the sides of the shaft and suspending the car in place. Installed in a five-story department store in New York City in 1857, Otis’ first commercial passenger elevator soon changed the world’s skyline, making skyscrapers a practical reality and turning the most valuable real estate on its head—from the first floor to the penthouse.


History of Elevators

Since the dawn of time, humans sought the way for more efficient vertical transportation of freight and passengers to different levels. These devices for transport goods up and down represent first elevators.

Elevator history begins several hundred years before Christ. The earliest elevators were called hoists. They were powered by human and animal power, or sometimes water-driven mechanisms. They were in use as early as the 3rd century BC.

Modern elevators were developed during the 1800s. These crude elevators slowly evolved from steam driven to hydraulic power. The first hydraulic elevators were designed using water pressure as the source of power.

They were used for conveying materials in factories, warehouses and mines. Hydraulic elevators were often used in European factories.

In 1852, Elisha Graves Otis introduced the first safety contrivance for elevators.

Otis established a company for manufacturing elevators and went on to dominate the elevator industry. Today the Otis Elevator Factory is the world's largest manufacturer of vertical transport systems.

Revolution in elevator technology began with the invention of hydraulic and electricity.

Motor technology and control methods evolved rapidly and electricity quickly became the accepted source of power. The safety and speed of these elevators were significantly enhanced.

The first electric elevator was built by the German inventor Wener Von Siemens in 1880.

In 1889, the first commercially successful electric elevator was installed.

In 1887, an electric elevator with automatic doors that would close off the elevator shaft was patented. This invention made elevators safer.

Many changes in elevator design and installation was made by the great advances in electronic systems during World War II.

Space elevators use the same concept of classic elevator. They will be used to transport people to space station. This concept theoretically can considerably reduce the cost for putting a person into space.

Today, modern commercial buildings commonly have multiple elevators with a unified control system. In addition, all modern elevators have special override controls (to make elevators go directly to a specific floor without intermediate stops).


Who Invented the Elevator?

The history of the elevator, if you define it as a platform that can move people and objects up and down, is actually a rather long one. Rudimentary elevators are known to have been in use in ancient Rome as far back as 336 B.C., with the first reference of one built by the talented Archimedes.

These early elevators were open cars rather than enclosed ones, and consisted of a platform with hoists that would enable the car to move vertically. The hoists were typically worked manually, either by people or animals, though sometimes water wheels were used. Romans continued to use these simple elevators for many years, usually to move water, building materials, or other heavy items from one place to another.

As for the dedicated passenger elevator, this was created in the 18th century, with one of the first used by King Louis XV in 1743. He had an elevator constructed at Versailles that would carry him from his apartments on the first floor to his mistress' apartments on the second floor. This elevator wasn't much more technologically advanced than those used in Rome. To make it work, men stationed in a chimney pulled on the ropes. They called it a "flying chair."

It wasn't until the 1800s that elevator technology really started to advance. For starters, elevators no longer needed to be worked manually. In 1823, two British architects—Burton and Hormer—built a steam-powered "ascending room" to take tourists up to a platform for a view of London. Several years later, their invention was expanded upon by architects Frost and Stutt who added a belt and counter-weight to the steam power.

Soon enough, hydraulic systems began to be created as well, using water pressure to raise and lower the elevator car. However, this wasn't practical in some cases—pits had to be dug below the elevator shaft to enable the piston to pull back. The higher the elevator went, the deeper the pit had to be. Thus, this wasn't a viable option for taller buildings in big cities.

So despite the hydraulic systems being somewhat safer than steam-powered/cabled elevators, the steam powered ones with cables and counterweights, stuck around. They had just one major drawback: the cables could snap, and sometimes did, which sent the elevator plummeting to the bottom of the shaft, killing passengers and damaging building materials or other items being transported. Needless to say, no one was jumping to get on these dangerous elevators and so passenger elevators up to this point were largely a novelty.

The man who solved the elevator safety problem, making skyscrapers possible, was Elisha Otis, who is generally known as the inventor of the modern elevator. In 1852, Otis came up with a design that had a safety "brake." In the event that the cables broke, a wooden frame at the top of the elevator car would snap out and hit the walls of the shaft, stopping the elevator in its tracks.

Otis himself demonstrated the device, which he called a "safety hoist," at the New York World's Fair in 1854, when he went up in a make-shift elevator himself and had the ropes cut. Rather than plummeting to his death as the audience thought might happen, his safety hoist snapped out, catching the elevator within seconds. Needless to say, the crowd was impressed.

Otis went on to found his own elevator company, which installed the first public elevator in a New York building in 1874. The Otis Elevator Company is still known today as the world's largest elevator manufacturer.

While the cable elevator design has remained, many additional improvements have been made, the most obvious of which is that elevators now run on electricity rather than steam power, a change that came about starting in the 1880s. The electric elevator was patented by Alexander Miles in 1887, though one had been built by the German inventor Werner von Siemens in 1880.

Otis' safety hoist wasn't the end of safety innovation, either. These days, it's virtually impossible for an elevator to plummet and kill passengers. There are now multiple steel cables to hold the elevator's weight, plus a number of different braking systems to stop an elevator from falling if the cables somehow snap. If, despite all these safety measures, the elevator does fall, there are shock absorbers at the bottom of the shaft, making it unlikely death will occur and reducing the possibility of serious injury.


This Is the Patent for the Device That Made Elevators a Lot Less Dangerous

R iding in an elevator used to be dangerous business &mdash until Elisha Otis, of Otis Elevator Company fame, invented a device that could prevent a passenger elevator from falling if its rope broke. It debuted precisely 160 years ago at the E.V. Haughwout and Company store in Manhattan on March 23, 1857.

Otis had demonstrated how it worked a few years earlier in a dramatic demonstration at America’s first world’s fair at the Crystal Palace (now Bryant Park) in New York City. He rode the platform high in the air and ordered the rope cut. The crowd cheered.

“A model of engineering simplicity, the safety device consisted of a used wagon spring that was attached to both the top of the hoist platform and the overhead lifting cable,” wrote Joseph J. Fucini and Suzy Fucini in Entrepreneurs: The Men and Women Behind Famous Brand Names and How They Made It, as quoted by The American Society of Mechanical Engineers. “Under ordinary circumstances, the spring was kept in place by the pull of the platform’s weight on the lifting cable. If the cable broke, however, this pressure was suddenly released, causing the big spring to snap open in a jaw-like motion. When this occurred, both ends of the spring would engage the saw-toothed ratchet-bar beams that Otis had installed on either side of the elevator shaft, thereby bringing the falling hoist platform to a complete stop.”


A Brief History of Elevators

In our past post, we discussed ASME A17.1-2016 – Safety Code for Elevators and Escalators, a standard that has been in effect for almost 100 years. While a near-century is a long time, it only occupies part of the period in which elevators have been integral to our world, and only a mere fraction of the complete history of elevators.

Elevators are arguably one of the most important inventions in human history, and their power-driven vertical movements have long been integral in making building stories accessible and practical for construction. The elevator draws its origins in Ancient Greece, where the already-established system of pulleys was adapted into the first lift.

Ancient Elevators

It is strongly believed that Archimedes invented the first elevator back in 236 B.C., and his model functioned with hoisting ropes wound around a drum. These ropes were connected to a capstan, which was operated by direct human labor. This elevator became standardized significantly throughout the region, and it would have been found in many different locations in Ancient Greece.

Ancient Rome also made use of the ingenuity that came from elevator use, and the equipment was common for moving animals and goods. In fact, they were an important part of the Colosseum. In the ancient grand amphitheater, lions, wolves, leopards, and bears would rise out of seemingly hidden holes in the ground to take part in gladiator battles. Today, we know that this was conducted by a lift system that led up into trap doors.

In the Colosseum, there were somewhere between 28 and 30 lifts, and the animals traveled up 23-feet tall wooden shafts before making their appearance. Each lift was designed to transport 600 pounds at once – roughly the weight of two lions – through the use of manpower, much like the Greek elevators. However, to carry such weight, the capstans required eight men to push and pull. This means if all lifts operated at once, there would be 200 workers operating the machines.

“The Flying Chair”

These two examples are that of early lifts, but they differ greatly from what we know today as passenger elevators. The earliest of these didn’t appear until 1743, and it was located outside the king’s palace in Versailles. This elevator was designed for King Louis XV and connected the first and second floors of the building. “The Flying Chair”, as it was called, linked the king’s quarters to those of his mistress.

Men stationed inside a chimney operated the Flying Chair, and they used ropes and pulleys to raise and lower the elevator.

Hydraulic Elevators

Elevators, just like many other advances in technology, became far more common in the mid-1800s during the Industrial Revolution. Many of these elevators were based off the hydraulic system, in which a piston inside a cylinder used pressure from water or oil to raise or lower the elevator car. The main drawback with these lifts was that the buildings containing them needed to have pits below the elevator shaft so that the pistons could draw completely back. The higher the building was, the deeper the pit had to be, making this lift type highly impractical.

An alternative model to this used a cable system, in which ropes raised and lower the car by means of a pulley and gear system. A counterweight helped to conserve energy. This design is much closer to what we use today.

In the mid-Nineteenth Century, both of these types of elevators were powered by pressure or steam.

Improved Cable System

However, the elevators operating on cable systems were rarely favored during this time, simply because their use posed incredible risk (this was long before the publication of ASME A17.1). With no safeguards, if the cables broke, the car would drop to the ground. For freight, this was a major nuisance and could be responsible for property damage. For human passengers, the thought that a single minor error in the cable system would most likely result in death made the design remarkably undesirable.

At the 1854 New York World’s Fair, Elisha Otis and his sons revealed an innovation to the elevator cable system that made them far more practical. This was a safety device, and it included a wooden frame at the top of the platform that would snap out against the sides of the elevator shaft if the ropes broke, essentially functioning as a brake. Otis’ elevator company, the Otis Brothers, installed the first public elevator in a five-story New York department store in 1874.

Elevators and Electricity into the Modern Age

The advent of electricity in the late Nineteenth Century brought on an age in which more power was accessible to drive elevator cars. In 1887, an electric elevator, using the style pioneered by Werner von Siemens, was developed in Baltimore, using a revolving drum to wind the hoisting rope. Unfortunately, these drums were not large enough to store the long hoisting ropes required by skyscrapers and other large structures.

However, the rapid advancement of motor technology brought on the gearless traction electric elevator by the early 1900s, allowing for taller buildings. Multi-speed motors soon replaced the original single-speed models, and push-button controls modernized the elevator even further.

Aside from these, elevators have undergone many different changes in the century since the initial publication of ASME A17.1. Today, from the technology of the computer age, elevators are able to function with extreme efficiency and safety.

The Importance of the Elevator

So far, we’ve looked at important developments in the elevator’s history, but this doesn’t fully demonstrate the significance of the invention in our society. Some of the benefits of elevators are obvious: allowing for the construction of skyscrapers and high-rise buildings, granting greater accessibility (especially for the disabled), etc.

The influence of these few direct benefits are truly from where the invention of the elevator draws its significance in the Modern Age. While tall buildings traditionally served as status symbols in the past, seemingly demonstrating their greatness simply from their existence, they were also a practical way for providing more space in a fixed amount of land. In the early days of their construction, this was essential. In places like New York, taller buildings gave factory owners and workers space that was both more humane and more efficient, allowing industries to expand.

This growth has continued until today, and it was only ever possible with the presence of elevators. All the people and business that have been packed into the Earth’s metropolises owe a major part of their lifestyles to this invention. These places remain the most economically powerful in the world. In this way, the elevator was one of the key players in shaping our society.

In the present and future, with urbanization on the rise, the elevator’s importance only continues. Today, about half of the human population lives in cities. By 2050, it is estimated that the urban population will be about 5.1 billion, or two-thirds of the world population by that time. Of course, we will also likely see the incorporation of technological advancements in elevator systems to continue their safe and efficient use.


Who Invented the Elevator? American Inventor Elisha Graves Otis and before

Elisha Graves Otis (August 3, 1811 – April 8, 1861) was an American industrialist, founder of the Otis Elevator Company, and inventor of a safety device that prevents elevators from falling if the hoisting cable fails.

Like is so often true, the answer depends upon your point of view. If looking for the first documented device that could do the job the answer is Archimedes, but . . .

Archimedes invented a vertical box moved up and down by a set of ropes and pulleys with the power source to move the ropes being horses or men pulling on the ropes. Primitive elevators of this kind can be documented to have been used throughout the Middle Ages to move cargo or other heavy loads vertically. The first elevator specifically designed to move people was installed at Versailles for Louis XIV. The King could enter a lift chair from an outside balcony, and men inside the walls could use ropes and pulleys attached to counterweights to lift or lower his royal personage, but the first device truly resembling what we now call an elevator and designed to carry passengers was built by Elisha Graves Otis.

Like in so many other cases, the steam engine revolutionized what was possible for moving heavy loads vertically, and hydraulics was not far behind. Still, by 1850 this sort of lifting was still considered dangerous and usually limited to heavy engineering and construction applications. Elisha Graves Otis changed all of that, and made the kind of machine most people usually think of when hearing the word “elevator” possible by inventing a safety brake in 1852 for freight elevators. Elevators with this brake were so safe that riding in them did not seem like the least bit of risk. The cable could completely break and the elevator would not fall. It didn’t take long for Otis to realize the potential of his elevators for carrying passengers to the upper floors of tall buildings. He displayed his machines at the World’s Fair in the Crystal Palace in New York. He installed his first passenger elevator in a New York Department store in 1857, and by 1873 there were over 2000 Otis elevators in operation.

Elisha Otis continued in the business and design of elevators throughout the rest of his life. When he died in 1861 his sons Charles and Norton followed in his footsteps with the family registering patents for improvements in elevator design in 1861 and 1903. When his sons took over the company they changed the name to Otis Brothers & Company which later merged with a number of other elevator manufacturers to form the Otis Elevator Company. This American inventor from Vermont is, without a doubt, the father of the modern passenger elevators that make high rise buildings, metropolitan skylines, and city life what they are today.


The Truth Of The Matter

The truth is… we still don’t actually know what the truth is regarding Elisa’s death. We know it’s a tragedy. We know that she struggled from time to time. And we know that she died far too young. But we may never know anything beyond that.

The legend of the Elevator Game lives on, though — passed around from forum to forum, from storyteller to storyteller, told around the digital versions of what was once an actual campfire.


Who Invented The Elevator?

The history of the elevator, if you define it as a platform that can move people and objects up and down, is actually a rather long one. Rudimentary elevators are known to have been in use in ancient Rome as far back as 336 BC, with the first reference of one built by the talented Archimedes.

These early elevators were open cars rather than enclosed ones, and consisted of a platform with hoists that would enable the car to move vertically. The hoists were typically worked manually, either by people or animals, though sometimes water wheels were used. Romans continued to use these simple elevators for many years, usually to move water, building materials, or other heavy items from one place to another.

As for the dedicated passenger elevator, this was created in the 18th century, with one of the first used by King Louis XV in 1743. He had an elevator constructed at Versailles that would carry him from his apartments on the first floor to his mistress’ apartments on the second floor. This elevator wasn’t much more technologically advanced than those used in Rome. To make it work, men stationed in a chimney pulled on the ropes. They called it a “flying chair.”

It wasn’t until the 1800s that elevator technology really started to advance. For starters, elevators no longer needed to be worked manually. In 1823, two British architects — Burton and Hormer — built a steam-powered “ascending room” to take tourists up to a platform for a view of London. Several years later, their invention was expanded upon by architects Frost and Stutt who added a belt and counter-weight to the steam power.

Soon enough, hydraulic systems began to be created as well, using water pressure to raise and lower the elevator car. However, this wasn’t practical in some cases — pits had to be dug below the elevator shaft to enable the piston to pull back. The higher the elevator went, the deeper the pit had to be. Thus, this wasn’t a viable option for taller buildings in big cities.

So despite the hydraulic systems being somewhat safer than steam-powered/cabled elevators, the steam powered ones with cables and counterweights, stuck around. They had just one major drawback: the cables could snap, and sometimes did, which sent the elevator plummeting to the bottom of the shaft, killing passengers and damaging building materials or other items being transported. Needless to say, no one was jumping to get on these dangerous elevators and so passenger elevators up to this point were largely a novelty.

The man who solved the elevator safety problem, making skyscrapers possible, was Elisha Otis, who is generally known as the inventor of the modern elevator. In 1852, Otis came up with a design that had a safety “brake.” In the event that the cables broke, a wooden frame at the top of the elevator car would snap out and hit the walls of the shaft, stopping the elevator in its tracks.

Otis himself demonstrated the device, which he called a “safety hoist,” at the New York World’s Fair in 1854, when he went up in a make-shift elevator himself and had the ropes cut. Rather than plummeting to his death as the audience thought might happen, his safety hoist snapped out, catching the elevator within seconds. Needless to say, the crowd was impressed.

Otis went on to found his own elevator company, which installed the first public elevator in a New York building in 1874. The Otis Elevator Company is still known today as the world’s largest elevator manufacturer.

While the cable elevator design has remained, many additional improvements have been made, the most obvious of which is that elevators now run on electricity rather than steam power, a change that came about starting in the 1880s. The electric elevator was patented by Alexander Miles in 1887, though one had been built by the German inventor Werner von Siemens in 1880.

Otis’ safety hoist wasn’t the end of safety innovation, either. These days, it’s virtually impossible for an elevator to plummet and kill passengers. There are now multiple steel cables to hold the elevator’s weight, plus a number of different braking systems to stop an elevator from falling if the cables somehow snap. If, despite all these safety measures, the elevator does fall, there are shock absorbers at the bottom of the shaft, making it unlikely death will occur and reducing the possibility of serious injury.


Who invented the elevator?

At the time, elevators that operated on a cable system were considered unreliable and dangerous, because, if the ropes broke, the elevator plummeted to the bottom. Freight could be damaged, but, more importantly, passengers were often killed by the fall. The person who found a solution to this problem revolutionized the concept of the elevator. But was it Elisha Otis, or Otis Tufts?

While working in a factory in 1852, Elisha Otis and his sons came up with an elevator design that employed a safety device. A wooden frame at the top of the platform would snap out against the sides of the elevator shaft if the ropes broke, essentially functioning as a brake. Otis called it the "safety hoist" and dramatically demonstrated this design at the 1854 New York World's Fair. He rode the platform high into the air and then had the rope cut, but, thanks to the brake, it only fell a few inches before stopping. Otis founded an elevator company, Otis Brothers, which installed the first public elevator in a five-story New York department store in 1874. Electric elevators came about in the 1880s.

This means that Elisha Otis is the inventor of the modern passenger elevator, right? It depends on who you ask. Until the World's Fair demonstration, Otis hadn't had much luck selling elevators, and his initial elevator patent in 1861 was for a freight elevator -- the open platform kind -- not an enclosed passenger one. For this reason, some think of another Otis, Otis Tufts, as the actual inventor of the modern passenger elevator. Two years before Elisha Otis, Tufts patented an elevator design that had benches inside an enclosed car, with doors that opened and closed automatically.

There's a key reason why Elisha Otis gets the credit and not Tufts. Tufts' design did away with the typical rope and pulley system due to safety concerns. Instead, he used the concept of a nut threading up and down a screw. The elevator car was the nut, threaded onto a giant steel screw that extended the entire length of the shaft. While it was very safe, it was also expensive and impractical -- especially for very tall buildings. Tufts did sell a few of his elevators, but his design wasn't widely adopted.

The Otis Brothers Company (today known as the Otis Elevator Company) continued to make improvements in elevator safety and efficiency. Today, it's the world's largest manufacturer of elevators and escalators, while Tufts is known more for his inventions of the steam-powered printing press and the steam-powered pile driver.

The possibility of a plummeting elevator makes for an exciting action sequence in the movies, but, in reality, modern elevators are very safe. Not only do they have multiple steel cables, each capable of supporting the elevator's weight, but there are also several different braking systems. Safeties -- brakes on either side of the car -- engage when the car moves too fast. Electromagnetic brakes switch on when the car stops and if the elevator loses power. Other brakes located at the top and bottom of the elevator shaft come into play if the car gets too close to either end. If all of these different systems fail, there's a shock-absorbing system at the bottom of the shaft to cushion your fall. Most elevator-related accidents having nothing to do with the car falling usually, they involve people doing things like walking into open elevator shafts (due to an elevator malfunction) or getting hit by or stuck in elevator doors.


Who invented the elevator?

While you're zoning out in an elevator, waiting to reach your floor, do you ever wonder who came up with the idea? Probably not. We just expect to have safe, working elevators in multistory buildings -- and we get pretty irritated when we have to take the stairs instead. While there is one person typically credited with the invention, it's naturally more complicated than that.

Elevators existed as far back as ancient Rome Archimedes was building them in 336 B.C., and gladiators and animals rode lifts to the Roman Coliseum arena by A.D. 80. Of course, those early "elevators" weren't enclosed cars. They were simple platforms and hoists, typically used to perform tasks such as raising up water for irrigation or lifting heavy building materials such as stones. These lifts were powered by animals, people or even water wheels.

What we're really talking about is the modern passenger elevator. The first one was built for King Louis XV in 1743 and was called "The Flying Chair." Installed on the outside of the king's palace at Versailles, his elevator went from the first to the second floor (linking the king's apartment to that of his mistress).The king entered it from his balcony, and then men stationed inside a chimney raised and lowered the elevator through the use of ropes and pulleys.

Elevators became more common in the mid-1800s during the Industrial Revolution when they transported freight in factories and mines. These elevators were often based on the hydraulic system. A piston inside a cylinder used pressure from water or oil to raise and lower the car. The drawback was that buildings with hydraulic elevators needed to have pits below the elevator shaft so that the piston could draw completely back. The higher the building was, the deeper the pit had to be. This design was impractical for very tall buildings, although it became popular in mansions because it could operate off the public water system.

Another elevator design (and the one found most often today in passenger elevators) uses a cable system, in which ropes raise and lower the car by means of a pulley and gear system. A counterweight, raised and lowered at the same time as the car, works like a seesaw and helps to conserve energy. These types of elevators are easier to control, and buildings that have them don't need the extra room required by hydraulic systems.

By the 1850s, these types of elevators were powered by water pressure or steam, but they still weren't very common. Read on to find out why -- and how the person who solved the problem may or may not be considered the inventor of the elevator.


A Brief, Interesting History of the Otis Elevator Company

Otis elevators are in the Burj Khalifa in Dubai, the world’s tallest building at 2,722 ft. Image © Emaar properties.

What do the Eiffel Tower, the Empire State Building, the Kremlin, and the Burj Khalifa have in common?

Elevators from the Otis Elevator Company. The company, which is celebrating its 160th anniversary today, has an interesting history: it was founded in 1853, the year Elisha Otis invented the elevator safety brake. Before Otis' invention, buildings rarely reached seven stories (elevators were considered just too dangerous to implement).

But it was Otis' elevator that would allow for the creation, and proliferation of, the skyscraper - an explosion that would for ever alter the 20th and 21st century skylines.

Read more about the Otis Elevators influence on skyscraper design (and how Otis performed a death-defying feat to increase the invention's popularity), after the break.

The first elevator shaft (built in 1853) actually preceded the first elevator by about four years architect Peter Cooper, confident that a safe elevator would soon be invented, designed New York's Union Foundation building with a cylindrical shaft (thinking that the most efficient shape). Otis would later design a special elevator just for the building.

In 1854, Otis attempted to shatter the public's conception of the elevator's perilousness by performing a dramatic, death-defying demonstration of his safety break feature, cutting the hoisting platform rope at New York's World Fair in 1854.

It seems the stunt worked - in 1857 the first Otis passenger elevator was installed at 488 Broadway. Soon after, the Otis elevator appeared in the Eiffel Tower and the Empire State Building.

Today, in conjunction with the implementation of the steel frame, the Otis elevator is generally considered the invention that paved the way for the global proliferation of skyscrapers.

While the original invention of the safety break elevator precipitated the design of 20th century skyscrapers, today's modern buildings are demanding the elevator's transformation. For example, the Otis Elevator Company's latest invention, the Gen2 Switch™ elevator, is solar-power capable.

It will be interesting to see if our century holds an invention that could similarly revolutionize architecture - what do you think it could be? Let us know in the comments below.


Watch the video: Who Invented the Elevator? (June 2022).


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