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Etruscan Sarcophagus of Larthia Seianti

Etruscan Sarcophagus of Larthia Seianti


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The Royal Tombs of UR

Couples are shown together eating. woman and man. both reclining like the usual position of the sarcophgi. It is hollowed out and normally has the ashes or treasures of the dead inside.

These two have more emotion in their pose and faces. To me they have a somewhat scared and lonely look and yet they are holding each other maybe it is saying they are together holding eachother as they pass into the after life.

Bonfante, Professor Larissa, Etruscan Life and Afterlife: a Handbook of Etruscan Studies. 1986 Wayne State University Press Detroit Michigan. Nov 12 2012 web.

Witcombe LCE Christopher. Art History Resources. May 2012. Web Nov 12 2012.


Etruscan Sarcophagus of Larthia Seianti - History

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The National Archaeological Museum of Florence is absolutely worth visiting! Located in Florence’s Palazzo della Crocetta, the museum dates to the age-old Medici and Lorraine art collections, featuring treasured Etruscan and Roman artifacts from archaeological digs in Tuscany, not to mention beautiful Egyptian and Greek collections. There are countless reasons to include this museum in your Florentine visit, but here are 10 to get you started.

Did you know that in 1829, Ippolito Rosellini worked alongside Jean-François Champollion, the man who translated hieroglyphics? The Italian Egyptologist returned with a collection treasures, including canopy vases, sarcophagi, statues, mummies, stele (carved slabs), a wooden chariot from Tutankhamen’s time and various wooden and bamboo objects (all installed in the museum in the late 19th century). Both children and adults adore perusing the captivating rooms set up to evoke an Egyptian temple or Pharaoh’s tomb, featuring faux columns, hieroglyphics and a ceiling painted to resemble a starry night.

If this famous Etruscan bronze statue could speak, its roar would attract hundreds of visitors worldwide. Found and sold in Arezzo in 1500 (hence its name), this large bronze statue features a lion’s head and body, a goat’s head on its back and a serpent’s tail. This mythological beast is Bellerofonte’s enemy, the hero who rides winged Pegasus. On the chimera’s leg you'll see the Etruscan inscription tincsvil, meaning "gift or offering," in this case to the god Tinia, the Etruscan Zeus.

In the same room, you’ll find another famous bronze statue, the Orator, or Arringatore, a man dressed in a typical Roman toga wearing fine sandals and raising his arm as if to silence a room. This statue also features an Etruscan inscription, indicating the Arringatore’s real name: Avile Meteli. His pose and clothing suggest his role as an important political figure, perhaps in Perugina in the 2nd century B.C.E. Isn’t it incredible how much we can learn from a statue? Like the chimera, the Arringatore merits close observation: this work is a true masterpiece of Etruscan and ancient art.

Larthia Seianti was a wealthy woman from Chiusi (located in southern Tuscany). She was buried in a spectacular sarcophagus depicting her positioned on a kline, a bed used by Etruscans during banquets. Her clothing is sumptuous and colorful, not to mention her striking ornamentation and jewelry. Beside the sarcophagus, other objects were found in her tomb, including small perfume holders, clips, a metal ear-cleaning device and Charon’s obolus, a coin used as payment for passage to the afterworld.

There are other Etruscan sarcophagi worth seeing, including one dedicated to the Amazons. It takes its name from the painting depicted on its four sides: the battle between men and Amazons, the warrior women of Greek mythology. The scene is highly dynamic not a single scene is repeated in the entire work, making the overall image truly astonishing.

This Roman bronze statue was discovered in Pesaro in 1500. The small statue depicts a nude youth in a classical pose similar to that of Greek statuary. Upon discovery, the statue was found with bits of vine in his hand, causing his identification as Bacchus, the god of wine. He thus became an idolino (little idol) and was mounted on a bronze base decorated with wine-related motifs. Today, scholars sustain that the figure is not a god: he is simply a young man holding a vine for hanging lanterns, which were used to illuminate banquets in the Roman villa in which he was found. God or mortal, this splendid work is nonetheless a precious and cherished example of Roman art.

This treasure is the world’s most famous Greek vase. Its name, François, stems from the 19th-century explorer who found it in a tomb near Chiusi. It is a large krater, a type of vase used to hold large amounts of wine during banquets (from which guests drew wine for their own cups). Its fame is due to the particular black figure frieze narrating important mythological events, including the funeral games for the death of Patroclus, the return of Theseus from Crete after his victory over the Minotaur and the marriage of Peleus and Thetis. Each figure and object is labeled in Greek, as are the artist’s names: Kritias and Ergotimos.

Like the chimera, the Minerva is another large Etruscan bronze statue. In Roman times, it adorned a room of the domus di Arretium. Discovered in Arezzo in 1541, it was immediately acquired by Cosimo I de 'Medici, who placed it in his studiolo inside Palazzo Vecchio. The goddess of wisdom and war is a hollow bronze figure realized using the cera persa (melted wax) technique. Restored by Carradori in 1785, the statue was given a wooden pole to stand, as it was also missing its right arm and part of its robe. After three centuries, the need to replace the wooden pole led to the restoration of the statue’s original appearance.

The museum structure belonged to the Medici family in the 17th century. To this end, a corridor contains one of the family’s best-kept secrets: a girl never seen public. To participate in mass at the nearby Church of Santissima Annunziata, they built a narrow, concealed corridor stretching from the museum’s second floor to an opening that overlooked the church. Perhaps there, hidden from other participants, she could momentarily distract herself from her status as prisoner inside her own home. The Medici Corridor is only open on select occasions.

Here, visitors can admire a great variety of funeral monuments used by Etruscans, including a tumulus and chamber and dado tombs.

The museum entrance is located on via Capponi in piazza Santissima Annunziata.

A little-known secret: you can also reserve tickets for the Galleria dell'Accademia or the Uffizi Gallery at the archaeological museum office.

Original guest post written by Marina Lo Blundo, an archaeologist and travel lover who blogs about her travels around the world.


Seianti Hanunia Tlesnasa: The Story of an Etruscan Noblewoman (British Museum Research Publication)

Now housed at the British Museum, the sarcophagus of noblewoman Seianti Hanunia Tlesnasa contained the best-preserved skeletal remains of any so far discovered in Etruscan central Italy. This volume presents 12 papers from members of a team of specialists placing the sarcophagus and remains within their historical and archaeological context. Coverage includes, for example, observations on the subject's dental and facial features and an examination of the pigments used in the sarcophagus. The volume is not indexed. Distributed in the U.S. by the David Brown Book Company. Annotation (c) Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

"synopsis" may belong to another edition of this title.

Judith Swaddling is curator of Etruscan material in the Department of Greek and Roman Antiquities at the British Museum. She organised the Museum's permanent exhibition, Italy before the Roman Empire, which opened in 1991 and has orchestrated several international conferences on Italic and Etruscan archaeology, the most recent being Etruscans Now, held at the British Museum in December 2002 and with which the publication of this book was arranged to coincide. Her publications include Italian Iron Age Artefacts in the British Museum (ed.) 1986, and Etruscan Mirrors in the British Museum (Corpus Speculorum Etruscorum, 1st British Museum fascicule, 2000). Her other specialisms are techniques of ancient metalwork, and ancient sport, whence The Ancient Olympic Games (2nd enlarged and revised edition, 1999), originally devised to coincide with a major British Museum exhibition of which she was organiser. John Prag is Keeper of Archaeology and Reader in Classics and Ancient History at the Manchester Museum in the University of Manchester. With Richard Neave he led the Manchester University team which pioneered the modern reconstruction of ancient faces, faces which include Philip II of Macedon, King Midas, and Lindow Man, found in a Cheshire bog in 1984. Together they wrote Making Faces Using Forensic and Archaeological Techniques (British Museum Press, 1997, reprinted 1999), which is at the same time the first accessible account of the technique and a textbook in several universities on both sides of the Atlantic. Dr Prag is particularly interested in the way facial reconstruction and the multidisciplinary approach that underpins it can be used to solve problems in archaeology and art history, as the Seianti project illustrates most dramatically. He has written extensively on many aspects of Greek art and archaeology, and is presently involved in projects to study ancient Greek DNA, and the chemical analysis of ancient Greek pottery. He is also directing a series of interdisciplinary projects to understand the history and landscape of Alderley Edge in Cheshire. He has curated many exhibitions for the Manchester Museum as well as the prize-winning permanent Mediterranean Gallery (opened 1993).

The magnificent painted terracotta sarcophagus of the Etruscan noblewoman Seianti Hanunia Tlesnasa has for well over a century been a star exhibit at the British Museum, but it is only in relatively recent times that attention has turned to the skeleton found within, which appears to be the best preserved Etruscan skeleton now in existence. The initial aim of the research was to reconstruct the face of Seianti using the techniques of forensic medicine, in order to compare it with that of the reclining, full-sized image of the dead woman on the sarcophagus lid. This already yielded striking information about the Etruscans as the initiators of realistic portraiture - we believe this to be the first proven identifiable portrait in western art. Other avenues opened up allowing the researchers to discover fascinating facts about Seianti's health and dental problems, her lifestyle, her age at death, and an accident in her teens that had far-reaching consequences. The pathologist's findings have offered evidence for Etruscan mortuary practices hitherto unparalleled.Consideration of the silver tomb goods, the jewellery worn by Seianti and the radiocarbon dating of the bones has indicated a dating of the burial earlier in the Hellenistic period than previously accepted.

The construction of the sarcophagus itself, a remarkable feat of firing, and the techniques of its decoration form the subject of other papers, while the circumstances of the find in 1876, the archaeology and evidence about the Seiante family are discussed in detail. A brief survey of the Etruscans and events contemporary with Seianti's lifetime help to set the burial in its ancient context.


Etruscan Sarcophagus of Larthia Seianti - History

Tanaquil, daughter of an aristocratic Etruscan family, married the son of Damaratus, a refugee from Corinth, and an Etruscan woman. Strong, resourceful, and proud in character, Tanaquil saw her husband’s potential for leadership, but realized that as the son of an immigrant he had little chance of attaining high political position in Tarquinia. She urged him to emigrate to Rome, a city of growing power not dominated by a native aristocracy. On their journey Tanaquil saw and interpreted an omen fortelling Tarquin’s future kingship. In Rome, he assumed the Roman name Lucius Tarquinius Priscus while Tanaquil kept hers. His character and political acumen so endeared him to King Ancus Marcius that he was made guardian of the royal children. When the king died before his children reached adulthood, Tarquin used his popularity to become the fifth King of Rome (616-579 BCE), Rome’s first Etruscan royalty. Livy is neutral about Tanaquil’s “king-making,” but he later shows how the ruthlessly ambitious Tullia claims Tanaquil as a precedent for her aggressive behavior.

Chapter 34 (4) Lucumoni contra, omnium heredi bonorum, cum divitiae iam animos facerent, auxit ducta in matrimonium Tanaquil, summo loco nata et quae haud facile iis in quibus nata erat humiliora sineret ea quo innupsisset.
(5) Spernentibus Etruscis Lucumonem exsule advena ortum, ferre indignitatem non potuit, oblitaque ingenitae erga patriam caritatis dummodo virum honoratum videret, consilium migrandi ab Tarquiniis cepit.
(6) Roma est ad id potissima visa: in novo populo, ubi omnis repentina atque ex virtute nobilitas sit, futurum locum forti ac strenuo viro regnasse Tatium Sabinum, arcessitum in regnum Numam a Curibus, et Ancum Sabina matre ortum nobilemque una imagine Numae esse.
(7) Facile persuadet ut cupido honorum et cui Tarquinii materna tantum patria esset. Sublatis itaque rebus amigrant Romam.
(8) Ad Ianiculum forte ventum erat ibi ei carpento sedenti cum uxore aquila suspensis demissa leviter alis pilleum aufert, superque carpentum cum magno clangore volitans rursus velut ministerio divinitus missa capiti apte reponit inde sublimis abiit.
(9) Accepisse id augurium laeta dicitur Tanaquil, perita ut volgo Etrusci caelestium prodigiorum mulier. Excelsa et alta sperare complexa virum iubet: eam alitem ea regione caeli et eius dei nuntiam venisse circa summum culmen hominis auspicium fecisse levasse humano superpositum capiti decus ut divinitus eidem redderet.
(10) Has spes cogitationesque secum portantes urbem ingressi sunt, domicilioque ibi comparato L. Tarquinium Priscum edidere nomen.

Chapter 39 (1) Eo tempore in regia prodigium visu eventuque mirabile fuit. Puero dormienti, cui Servio Tullio fuit nomen, caput arsisse ferunt multorum in conspectu
(2) plurimo igitur clamore inde ad tantae rei miraculum orto excitos reges, et cum quidam familiarium aquam ad restinguendum ferret, ab regina retentum, sedatoque eam tumultu moveri vetuisse puerum donec sua sponte experrectus esset
(3) mox cum somno et flammam abisse. Tum abducto in secretum viro Tanaquil "Viden tu puerum hunc" inquit, "quem tam humili cultu educamus? Scire licet hunc lumen quondam rebus nostris dubiis futurum praesidiumque regiae adflictae proinde materiam ingentis publice privatimque decoris omni indulgentia nostra nutriamus."
(4) [ferunt] Inde puerum liberum loco coeptum haberi erudirique artibus quibus ingenia ad magnae fortunae cultum excitantur. Evenit facile quod dis cordi esset: iuvenis evasit vere indolis regiae nec, cum quaereretur gener Tarquinio, quisquam Romanae iuventutis ulla arte conferri potuit, filiamque ei suam rex despondit.
(5) Hic quacumque de causa tantus illi honos habitus credere prohibet serva natum eum parvumque ipsum servisse. Eorum magis sententiae sum qui Corniculo capto Ser. Tulli, qui princeps in illa urbe fuerat, gravidam viro occiso uxorem, cum inter reliquas captiuas cognita esset, ob unicam nobilitatem ab regina Romana prohibitam ferunt servitio partum Romae edidisse Prisci Tarquini in domo
(6) inde tanto beneficio et inter mulieres familiaritatem auctam et puerum, ut in domo a parvo eductum, in caritate atque honore fuisse fortunam matris, quod, capta patria in hostium manus venerit, ut serva natus crederetur fecisse.

Tanaquil took charge of the situation after the fatal attack made on Tarquinius by assassins hired by Ancus Marcius’ two sons, whom Tarquinius had outmaneuvered for the kingship. By giving careful instructions to Servius and calming the populace with lies about her husband’s condition, she made it possible for Servius to assume leadership and then win the kingship. Her reported speech to the gathered citizens is her last appearance in Livy’s history.

Chapter 41 (1) Tarquinium moribundum cum qui circa erant excepissent, illos fugientes lictores comprehendunt. Clamor inde concursusque populi, mirantium quid rei esset. Tanaquil inter tumultum claudi regiam iubet, arbitros eiecit. Simul quae curando volneri opus sunt, tamquam spes subesset, sedulo comparat, simul si destituat spes, alia praesidia molitur.
(2) Servio propere accito cum paene exsanguem virum ostendisset, dextram tenens orat ne inultam mortem soceri, ne socrum inimicis ludibrio esse sinat.
(3) "Tuum est" inquit, "Servi, si vir es, regnum, non eorum qui alienis manibus pessimum facinus fecere. Erige te deosque duces sequere qui clarum hoc fore caput divino quondam circumfuso igni portenderunt. Nunc te illa caelestis excitet flamma nunc expergiscere vere. Et nos peregrini regnavimus qui sis, non unde natus sis reputa. Si tua re subita consilia torpent, at tu mea consilia sequere."
(4) Cum clamor impetusque multitudinis vix sustineri posset, ex superiore parte aedium per fenestras in Novam viam versas—habitabat enim rex ad Iovis Statoris—populum Tanaquil adloquitur.
(5) Iubet bono animo esse sopitum fuisse regem subito ictu ferrum haud alte in corpus descendisse iam ad se redisse inspectum volnus absterso cruore omnia salubria esse confidere propediem ipsum eos visuros interim Ser. Tullio iubere populum dicto audientem esse eum iura redditurum obiturumque alia regis munia esse.

Click on the underlined words for translation aids and commentary, which will appear in a small window. Close the small window after each use.


Seianti Hanunia Tlesnasa: The Story of an Etruscan Noblewoman

The magnificent painted terracotta sarcophagus of the Etruscan noblewoman Seianti Hanunia Tlesnasa has for well over a century been a star exhibit at the British Museum, but it is only in relatively recent times that attention has turned to the skeleton found within, which appears to be the best preserved Etruscan skeleton now in existence. The initial aim of the research was to reconstruct the face of Seianti using the techniques of forensic medicine, in order to compare it with that of the reclining, full-sized image of . Read More

The magnificent painted terracotta sarcophagus of the Etruscan noblewoman Seianti Hanunia Tlesnasa has for well over a century been a star exhibit at the British Museum, but it is only in relatively recent times that attention has turned to the skeleton found within, which appears to be the best preserved Etruscan skeleton now in existence. The initial aim of the research was to reconstruct the face of Seianti using the techniques of forensic medicine, in order to compare it with that of the reclining, full-sized image of the dead woman on the sarcophagus lid. This already yielded striking information about the Etruscans as the initiators of realistic portraiture - we believe this to be the first proven identifiable portrait in western art. Other avenues opened up allowing the researchers to discover fascinating facts about Seianti's health and dental problems, her lifestyle, her age at death, and an accident in her teens that had far-reaching consequences. The pathologist's findings have offered evidence for Etruscan mortuary practices hitherto unparalleled. Consideration of the silver tomb goods, the jewellery worn by Seianti and the radiocarbon dating of the bones has indicated a dating of the burial earlier in the Hellenistic period than previously accepted. The construction of the sarcophagus itself, a remarkable feat of firing, and the techniques of its decoration form the subject of other papers, while the circumstances of the find in 1876, the archaeology and evidence about the Seiante family are discussed in detail. A brief survey of the Etruscans and events contemporary with Seianti's lifetime help to set the burial in its ancient context. Read Less


Compare and contrast aegean/greek and etruscan/roman art


Another difference was the reason for the particular buildings. Greeks made buildings to honor their gods. As a result, their buildings had less impressive interiors, but beautiful obtain it. Romans loved pleasure, respect and wealth. They as a result constructed lavish buildings to be able to echo their pleasurable uses. When it came to construction design, Greeks perfected the ‘post in addition to lintel’ design. The Aventure added the arch and the dome to their own buildings, which were absent in Greek designs.
Inside the protogeometric time period, the vases were colored with abstract geometric forms, such as triangles, groups and linear forms. They will subsequently changed to genuine images of humans inside burial processions during typically the geometric period. These urns were chosen for burial ceremonies and were referred to since amphora. While the Both roman murals were rich in color and hue, Ancient greek language vases were made associated with black and red shades only and were just simple depictions of humans and animals.

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The most obvious difference between Greek and Roman architecture is the material used. The Greeks used marble the Romans used concrete. An excellent way to illustrate the differences between Roman and Greek art would be to study the Parthenon (Greek) and the Pantheon (Roman), which are considered to be the most famous temples of either group.
The idealistic differences between the Greeks and Romans are perhaps what cause the differences in technique. The Greeks believed that art was an expression of perfection. They sought to encapsulate the perfect physical form of their objects in artwork. The Greeks often represented the gods in their art, in an effort to express the ideal form of beauty, physical strength and power. For the Romans, however, art had a more practical function. Artwork was primarily used for ornamentation and decoration. As noted at the History for Kids website, the Greeks were interested in ideals while the Romans were interested in reality. These fundamental idealistic differences are visible in their artwork.

“Art is man ‘s constant effort to create for himself a different order of reality from that which is given to him”. -Chinua Achebe The question of “What is art” is a discussion that for some people can be incredibly nuanced and challenging, while for others, it’s inexplicably simple. In this paper I will discuss the topic of what art is, it’s value to society, what it means to me and how this personal definition has evolved both over time and as a result of this course. In addition, this paper
she was sculpted. The quest for the answer to both of these questions provides an interesting insight into how we study history. When trying to date a piece of ancient art, historians use any and all information available to them. Such things include the signature of the artist if available, the style of the piece in comparison to known works, the materials used in conjunction with periods of known geographical sources, and the subject of the piece. But there are difficulties dating the Nike of


The Etruscans buried the cremated remains of the dead in funerary urns or decorated sarcophagi made of terracotta. Both types could feature a sculpted figure of the deceased on the lid and, in the case of sarcophagi, sometimes a couple. The most famous example of this latter type is the Sarcophagus of the Married Couple from Cerveteri, now in the Villa Giulia in Rome. In the Hellenistic Period the funerary arts really took off, and figures, although rendered in similar poses to the 6th-century BCE sarcophagi versions, become less idealised and more realistic portrayals of the dead. They usually portray only one individual and were originally painted in bright colours. The Sarcophagus of Seianti Thanunia Tlesnasa from Chiusi is an excellent example.
Largely replacing impasto wares from the 7th century BCE, bucchero was used for everyday purposes and as funerary and votive objects. Turned on the wheel, this new type of pottery had a more even firing and a distinctive glossy dark grey to black finish. Vessels were of all types and most often plain but they could be decorated with simple lines, spirals, and dotted fans incised onto the surface. Three-dimensional figures of humans and animals could also be added. The Etruscans were Mediterranean-wide traders, too, and bucchero was thus exported beyond Italy to places as far afield as Iberia, the Levant, and the Black Sea area. By the early 5th century BCE, bucchero was replaced by finer Etruscan pottery such as black- and red-figure wares influenced by imported Greek pottery of the period.


Tombs and necropoleis are among the most excavated and studied parts of Etruscan culture. Scholars learn about Etruscan society and culture from the study of Etruscan funerary practice. Burial urns and sarcophagi, both large and small, were used to hold the cremated remains of the dead.
Only by the end of the fifth century BCE was the true red-figure technique introduced to Etruria. In the second half of the fourth century BCE, mythological themes disappeared from the repertoire of the Etruscan vase painters.


British Museum, Etruscan sarcophagus

Etruscan painted sarcophagus, belonging to Seianti Hanunia Tlesnasa, dated to about 150-130 B.C.

#Department of Greek and Roman Antiquities

The Greek and Roman collection, including Etruscan artifacts, is one of the most extensive in the world, with more than 100 000 objects, presented in several galleries. The objects date from the Greek Bronze Age (about 3200 B.C.) to the age of Emperor Constantine in the 4th century A.D. Some of the highlights include the Parthenon gallery and finds from the Mausoleum of Halikarnassos.

#The British museum was founded in 1753, much due to the will of Sir Hans Sloane, who in his lifetime had made an extensive collection of curiosities - as was a habit of the 18th century if you were a well-educated man. This first part of the museum consisted of some 71 000 objects - being everything from natural specimens, prints by Albrecht Dürer and objects from long lost civilisations.

At first the museum was situated at Montague House, but it soon became too crowded there with a whole series of further donations, including the Rosetta Stone and other artifacts from ancient times. In the 19th century the museum was much expanded to house all these objects and to be able to show them to the public. In 1895 the museum bought the 69 houses surrounding the museum, demolished them and expanded the museum.

The natural history collection does not live in the museum now, and the books and manuscript are now held by the British Library - the main focus of the museum now being on cultural history, historical and more modern. It has now a collection of several million objects, covering 54,600 m2 and separated into 94 galleries.


Etruscans Portrait Etruscan Faces

Sarcophagus of earthenware of Seianti Hanunia Tlesnasa (150 b.c. ). Found in Poggio Cantarello, Chiusi.

Etruscans Portrait Etruscan Faces

In 1989 appeared in the libraries the collection of books ‘’Millelire’’ an initiative proposed by ‘’Stampa Alternativa Edizioni’’. Among its publications there is a curious book titled Ritratti Etruschi (Etruscan portraits) written by the roman photographer Marco Delogu. This composition is part of a broader project focused on the association of different individual portraits and their common experiences in life. Marco Delogu in his book Ritratti Etruschi takes as model Etruscan sculptures that as shown by the writer, after his travelling around Etruria, have affinity with people today. His research is quite interesting as it demonstrates that still today there are Etruscan roots among the Italians.

This work undertaken back in 1996 by Marco Delogu would be reconsidered years later by scientists who studied the DNA of some inhabitants of the modern Etruscan regions this studies revealed that still today after 2500 years Etruscan heredity exists and persists. We are not going to go down to scientific studies and demonstrations in this article, but we will follow the research of the photographer that allows us to be certain of such reality straight away. So, we can affirm that even though centuries have passed, in Italy there are still carriers of Etruscan genes.

We do not know whether the Etruscans discovered Genetics and all its implications, but they were convinced that after nine hundred years of Roman hegemony their genetic heritage would be completely cancelled. Clearly things went differently.

Ritratti Etruschi offers the readers a parallel dimension between ancient times and the present of the inhabitant of Etruria demonstrating the strong bound with our predecessors. So here we can see the face of a sculptures aside citizen faces from Tarquinia or Viterbo that by looking at eyes, shapes and facial expressions that without doubt are a living proof of a millennial history.
Only passionate visitors of Etruria such as Dennis and Lawrence knew how to pick up the characteristics of the residents in common with the Etruscans among the archaeological treasures and the Necropolis Lawrence tells what he saw

And in the full, dark, warm, handsome jovial faces surely you see the lustre still of the life-loving Etruscans! faces still jovial with Etruscan vitality

If you happen to pass by the streets of Etruria, look at the people who you meet. You will notice that Marco Delogu’s work is still on and has not stopped because the Etruscans are among us and within us.

Marco Delogu
Ritratti Etruschi (Etruscan portraits)
A composition of portraits of Etruscan sculptures preserved in the Tarquinia and Tuscania Museums and pictures of inhabitants who live where these statues were found. Stampa Alternativa, Roma (1996)

NB: After looking what the press has published recently, and to our delight, we communicate that Marco Delogu was appointed as new director at the Italian Cultural Institute in London. We send our congratulations for the important praise undoubtedly attained for his continuous commitment towards art and the support to culture.
We wholeheartedly wish that this reward will favour the Etruscan expansion up to the United Kingdom in order to promote a tourism based on cultural quality and renewed passion for one of the most mysterious and fascinating civilizations of the world.


Private Tour – 2-Hour Guided Visit of Florence Archaeological Museum

Excellent! We were 22 minutes late ue to a train delay and our guide sweet talked the security to let. read more Excellent! We were 22 minutes late ue to a train delay and our guide sweet talked the security to let us in anyways, and then she ensured we made it all the way to the top! I really appreciated the extra effort and the knowledge she provided. She even took great photos of us as well! read less

Everything ok, only need a little more time on top of the duomo.
Guide was very enjoyable and toke care of. read more Everything ok, only need a little more time on top of the duomo.
Guide was very enjoyable and toke care of us very well. read less

We essentially climed the dome of Florence. The view was just amazing. In my opinion it‘s a must for every. read more We essentially climed the dome of Florence. The view was just amazing. In my opinion it‘s a must for every visitor. The explanations of the tour guide were interesting as well especially if you are interested in history. read less

The tour was fabulous, hundreds of steps are worthy for a beautiful view and look on breathtaking look of paints. read more The tour was fabulous, hundreds of steps are worthy for a beautiful view and look on breathtaking look of paints on the Copula walls and ceiling. Unfortunately, the Baptiserium was closed, as well as the museum, and when we have bought the tickets there wasn´t mention about it. read less

Wonderful visite of the Duomo with an extraordinary guide! the guide Ilaria was just perfect! She was generous and patient. She gives us a lot of information about the. read more the guide Ilaria was just perfect! She was generous and patient. She gives us a lot of information about the Duomo. It was a great experience read less

We thank our guide Jiulia in the first instance, because thanks to her knowledge and sympathy she made it possible. read more We thank our guide Jiulia in the first instance, because thanks to her knowledge and sympathy she made it possible for our expectations to be exceeded. In short, all the service complied with what it offered and more read less

Outstanding guide! Spoke very good English and was extremely knowledgeable! Thanks Guacimo!

Knowledgeable and passionate guide made it fun and informative.

Very nice, you don't even queue for 5 minutes. And the spectacular climb, more to observe the frescoes of the. read more Very nice, you don't even queue for 5 minutes. And the spectacular climb, more to observe the frescoes of the dome very closely read less

Very informative guide & interesting tour.

amazingly knowledgeable guide!

Turned out to be a great private tour What an amazing your. Our tour guide was Filomena and she made the tour extra special. Full of jokes and. read more What an amazing your. Our tour guide was Filomena and she made the tour extra special. Full of jokes and info about Florence and wines from Chianti. We took off in a minivan and visited 2 wineries and had a hearty lunch at one of the wineries. We had 1 hr by ourselves in San Gimignano to just walk around. Highly recommend this tour and Filomena as a guide. read less

Fantastic way to see Florence if you're short on time! With only a few short hours in Florence, we wanted to make the most of our time here and see. read more With only a few short hours in Florence, we wanted to make the most of our time here and see as much as we could. We found Eco Tour completely by accident, but we're so happy we did! Our guide Isabella was amazing, so knowledgeable, friendly and helpful - she gave us a great tour around the major sites of Florence and helped us get an insight into the history of this incredibly beautiful city. Grazie mile Isabella! Highly recommended tour! read less

Our guide was extremely knowledgeable!

guided tour a must We did a small group guided tour of the Accademia Gallery primarily to see Michelangelo's "David". Our guide, Martina, was. read more We did a small group guided tour of the Accademia Gallery primarily to see Michelangelo's "David". Our guide, Martina, was excellent. She was very knowledgeable and engaging at the same time. I would highly recommend her as a guide. (Her English was impeccable - and it was her first time giving the tour in English!) read less

Great guide. interesting exhibits in Accademia Florence Punctual and very knowledgeable. made the experience interesting. First time she’d done a tour in English. very well done, lovely girl.

Great guide. very informative.
Beautiful experience !

Our guide Linda was great!!
The view was amazing.
The only thing that you should reconsider is the meeting point and the. read more Our guide Linda was great!!
The view was amazing.
The only thing that you should reconsider is the meeting point and the information given to us.
To be more specific you should inform people that the guide is there half an hour before the start of the tour.We were looking for a kiosk or something like that near porta della Mandorla that did't exist. read less

A private guide is the way to go Our tour guide, Francesca, was amazing. She was knowledgeable and friendly, and having her guidance made our visit to the. read more Our tour guide, Francesca, was amazing. She was knowledgeable and friendly, and having her guidance made our visit to the Duomo come to life. It’s so much better with a tour guide because you learn so much instead of just wandering blindly looking at beautiful art and architecture. read less

Ideal way to see the Duomo! Our group was comprised of only myself, my spouse and my parents in law and it was wonderful! Our guide. read more Our group was comprised of only myself, my spouse and my parents in law and it was wonderful! Our guide spoke excellent English and she was well versed in the dome’s history. Since our tickets had a specific entry time, we got to bypass the MASSIVE line and get right in. The only negatives of the whole experience came from interactions with the other tourists so I would absolutely recommend this tour to anyone visiting the dome! read less

Great tour! Our tour guide was entertaining and very knowledgeable about Florence's history.
I would recommend this tour

Thrilling Art, Charming Guide From the first our guide was all we could want in amiability and knowledge but she also brought us her. read more From the first our guide was all we could want in amiability and knowledge but she also brought us her own sense of excitement in being in the presence of masterpieces of the ages. read less

Quick but very informative tour of great works of Michelangelo Focused of course on the Michelangelo sculptures, starting from the very interesting ones that look unfinished but are actually finished. read more Focused of course on the Michelangelo sculptures, starting from the very interesting ones that look unfinished but are actually finished works. Can see individual chisel marks from large to small giving some insight into how the works are created. Tour guide gave helpful background and history and pointed out many details that would typically be missed or unappreciated. read less

This tour got you inside without waiting in line. The tour guide was very knowledgeable about the Duomo and it's. read more This tour got you inside without waiting in line. The tour guide was very knowledgeable about the Duomo and it's rich history. We were able to go all the way to the top of the dome no problem and see the art work close up. Again, the tour guide explained what we were seeing. It was well worth it! read less