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Pringle DD- 477 - History

Pringle DD- 477 - History


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Pringle
(DD-477: dp. 2,940 (f.); 1. 376'5", b. 39'7"; dr. 13'9"; s. 35 k.;

cpl. 329; a. 5 5", 10 40mm, 7 20mm, 10 21" tt., 2 dct., 6 dcp.; cl. Fletcher)

Pringle (DD-477) was laid down by the Navy Yard, Charleston, S.C., 31 July 1941; launched 2 May 1942, sponsored by Mrs. John D. H. Kane, and commissioned 15 September 1942, Lt. Comdr. Harold O. Larson in command.

Following shakedown, Pringle joined Convoy ON-154 in mid-Atlantic 1 January 1943 to escort the Halifax-bound

contingent. While on this duty she was the first U.S. destroyer to use an aircraft with catapult. On 6 February, she got underway for the Pacific Theater. Arriving off Guadaleanal 30 May, she took up patrol duties off the Solomons and, on the night of 17-18 July, joined Waller (DD-466) and Saupey (DD-465) in attsehng three Japanese destroyers off Vanga Point, Kolombangara. Seoring several torpedo hits, she also splashed a Japanese plane.

As the Solomons' Campaign continued into August, Pringle screened advance units of the Vella Lavella assault force escorted LST's through Gizo strait and on the 24th eovere minelaying operations off Kolombangara under Japanese guns. On the night of 3-4 September Pringle with Don (DD-572) made a sweep of Japanese barges between Gambi Head, Choiseul, and Kolombangara, sinking three.

While escorting TG 31.7 into Empress Augusta Bay, Bougainville, 11 November, 10 days after the initial landing there, Pringle shot down one Japanese plane and damaged another. With the exception of a run to Sydney in late January 1944, she continued to operate in the Solomons for the next few months. She swept the southwest coast of Bougainville during daylight in early March, bombarding enemy installations and beached barges.

The Marianas operation produced another long period of bombardment, screening and anti-submarine missions for Pringle. During the assaults on Saipan and Tinian, she conducted fire support operations.

After overhaul at Mare Island, Pringle sailed for Pearl Harbor 19 October. She departed Pearl Elarbor 10 November and bombarded near Ormoe Bay, Leyte, 27 28 November, splashing a Japanese plane on the same day.

Pringle eame under her most intense air attack while escorting a resupply eehelonto Mindoro from 27 to 30 December. Several ships in the convoy were sunk, while Pringle shot down two planes. On the 30th a Kamikaze crashed into her after deckhouse, hlling 11 men and injuring 20, totally destroymg one 40mm mount and damaging two 5-inch mounts.

Back in service in February, Pringle screened transports to Iwo Jima for the assault there on the 17th, then provided fire support for the Marines ashore. Returning to Ulithi 4 March, she prepared for the assault on Okinawa.

Operating with DesDiv 90, she screened transport areas, covered minesweepers, and provided support fire. Assigned to radar picket duty, 15 April, she splashed two Kamikazes on the 16th before a third crashed into her bridge, and plowed through the superstructure deck, abaft the base of number one stack. A single 1000 pound bomb, or two 500-pounders, penetrated the main and superstructure decks and exploded with a violent eruption, buckling the keel and splitting the vessel in two at the forward fire room. Six minutes later 258 survivors watched Pringle slide beneath the surface.

Pringle earned 10 battle stars for World War II service.


USS Pringle (DD 477)

Sunk by a Japanese kamikaze aircraft north-west of Okinawa in position 27º26'N, 126º59'E.
71 died and 245 were wounded which includes the Commanding Officer Lt Cdr John Lawrence Kelley,Jr. The 258 survivors were rescued by the USS Hobson/LCSL 34/LSMR 91.

For more information on this ship try this website (offsite link)

Commands listed for USS Pringle (DD 477)

Please note that we're still working on this section.

CommanderFromTo
1T/Cdr. Harold Oscar Larson, USN15 Sep 1942Sep 1943
2T/Cdr. George DeMetropolis, USNSep 194329 May 1944
3T/Lt.Cdr. John Lawrence Kelley, Jr., USN29 May 194416 Apr 1945

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Pringle DD- 477 - History

2,050 Tons
376' x 39' 8" x 17' 9"
5 x 5"/38 guns
10 x 40mm AA
7 x 20mm AA
10 x torpedo tubes
6 x depth charge
2 x depth charge tracks
1 x aircraft

Construction
Built by Charleston Navy Yard. Laid down on July 31, 1941. Pringle was one of the three Fletcher-class destroyers to be built (out of 6 planned) with a catapult for a float plane, but was later converted to the standard Fletcher class configuration. Launched on May 2, 1942. Comissioned September 15 , 1942 with with Lieutenant Commander Harold O. Larson in command.

Operating with Destroyer Division 90, she screened transport areas, covered minesweepers, and provided support fire and provided radar picket duty. On 15 April, she splashed two kamikazes.

Sinking History
On 16 April 1945 before a third crashed into her bridge, and plowed through the superstructure deck, abaft the base of number one stack. A single 1,000 pound bomb, or two 500-pounders, penetrated the main and superstructure decks and exploded with a violent eruption, buckling the keel and splitting the vessel in two at the forward fire room and sank within six minutes. Sixty-two of the crew were lost with the ship. Pringle earned 10 battle stars for World War II service.

Rescue
Of the surviving crew, 258 were rescued.

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DD-477 Pringle

Pringle (DD-477) was laid down by the Navy Yard, Charleston, S.C., 31 July 1941 launched 2 May 1942, sponsored by Mrs. John D. H. Kane, and commissioned 15 September 1942, Lt. Comdr. Harold O. Larson in command.

Following shakedown, Pringle joined Convoy ON-154 in mid-Atlantic 1 January 1943 to escort the Halifax-bound contingent. While on this duty she was the first U.S. destroyer to use an aircraft with catapult. On 6 February, she got underway for the Pacific Theater. Arriving off Guadalcanal 30 May, she took up patrol duties off the Solomons and, on the night of 17-18 July, joined Waller (DD-466) and Saufley (DD-465) in attacking three Japanese destroyers off Vanga Point, Kolombangara. Scoring several torpedo hits, she also splashed a Japanese plane.

As the Solomons' Campaign continued into August, Pringle screened advance units of the Vella Lavella assault force escorted LST's through Gizo strait and on the 24th covered minelaying operations off Kolombangara under Japanese guns. On the night of 3-4 September Pringle with Dyson (DD-572) made a sweep of Japanese barges between Gambi Head, Choiseul, and Kolombangara, sinking three.

While escorting TG 31.7 into Empress Augusta Bay, Bougainville, 11 November, 10 days after the initial landing there, Pringle shot down one Japanese plane and damaged another. With the exception of a run to Sydney in late January 1944, she continued to operate in the Solomons for the next few months. She swept the southwest coast of Bougainville during daylight in early March, bombarding enemy installations and beached barges.

The Marianas operation produced another long period of bombardment, screening and anti-submarine missions for Pringle. During the assaults on Saipan and Tinian, she conducted fire support operations.

After overhaul at Mare Island, Pringle sailed for Pearl Harbor 19 October. She departed Pearl Harbor 10 November and bombarded near Ormoc Bay, Leyte, 27-28 November, splashing a Japanese plane on the same day.

Pringle came under her most intense air attack while escorting a resupply echelonto Mindoro from 27 to 30 December. Several ships in the convoy were sunk, while Pringle shot down two planes. On the 30th a Kamikaze crashed into her after deckhouse, Killing 11 men and injuring 20, totally destroying one 40mm mount and damaging two 5-inch mounts.

Back in service in February, Pringle screened transports to Iwo Jima for the assault there on the 17th, then provided fire support for the Marines ashore. Returning to Ulithi 4 March, she prepared for the assault on Okinawa.

Operating with DesDiv 90, she screened transport areas, covered minesweepers, and provided support fire. Assigned to radar picket duty, 15 April, she splashed two Kamikazes on the 16th before a third crashed into her bridge, and plowed through the superstructure deck, abaft the base of number one stack. A single 1000 pound bomb, or two 500-pounders, penetrated the main and superstructure decks and exploded with a violent eruption, buckling the keel and splitting the vessel in two at the forward fire room. Six minutes later 258 survivors watched Pringle slide beneath the surface.


Fate [ edit | edit source ]

Operating with Destroyer Division 90, she screened transport areas, covered minesweepers, and provided support fire. Assigned to radar picket duty on 15 April, she splashed two kamikazes on 16 April 1945 before a third crashed into her bridge, and plowed through the superstructure deck, abaft the base of number one stack. A single 1,000 pound bomb, or two 500-pounders, penetrated the main and superstructure decks and exploded with a violent eruption, buckling the keel and splitting the vessel in two at the forward fire room. Six minutes later, 258 survivors watched Pringle slide beneath the surface.


Mục lục

Pringle được đặt lườn tại Xưởng hải quân Charleston vào ngày 31 tháng 7 năm 1941. Nó được hạ thủy vào ngày 2 tháng 5 năm 1942 được đỡ đầu bởi bà John D. H. Kane và nhập biên chế vào ngày 15 tháng 9 năm 1942 dưới quyền chỉ huy của Hạm trưởng, Thiếu tá Hải quân Harold O. Larson.

Pringle là một trong số ba tàu khu trục lớp Fletcher được hoàn tất với một máy phóng dành cho thủy phi cơ, trong kế hoạch tổng cộng sáu chiếc những chiếc kia là USS Stevens và USS Halford. Máy phóng và một cần cẩu được đặt ngay phía sau ống khói số 2, ở chỗ ống phóng ngư lôi số 2, bệ pháo 5 inch số 3, và tầng 2 của boong sau vốn thường mang một khẩu đội 40 mm phòng không nòng đôi trên đa số những chiếc trong lớp. Khẩu đội 40 mm nòng đôi được chuyển đến đuôi tàu, ngay trước các đường ray thả mìn sâu, nơi đa số những chiếc trong lớp bố trí các khẩu đội 20 mm. Dự định sẽ sử dụng những chiếc thủy phi cơ để trinh sát cho chi hạm đội khu trục mà các con tàu này được bố trí. Nó sẽ được phóng lên bằng máy phóng, hạ cánh trên biển cạnh con tàu, và được thu hồi bằng cần cẩu máy bay. Pringle là chiếc đầu tiên trong số năm chiếc được trang bị máy phóng để hoạt động do gặp vấn đề về thiết kế cần cẩu, nó không thể thu hồi chiếc thủy phi cơ Kingfisher. Hai chiếc chế tạo trong năm 1943, StevensHalford, có cần cẩu được thiết kế lại. [2] Stevens trở thành chiếc đầu tiên trong số năm chiếc phóng và thu hồi thành công máy bay. Tất cả cuối cùng đều được cải biến trở lại cấu hình tiêu chuẩn của lớp Fletcher.

Sau khi hoàn tất chạy thử máy, Pringle tham gia Đoàn tàu vận tải ON-154 tại một điểm hẹn giữa Đại Tây Dương vào ngày 1 tháng 1 năm 1943 để hộ tống chúng trong chặng đường đi đến Halifax, Nova Scotia. Trong nhiệm vụ này, nó là chiếc tàu khu trục Hoa Kỳ đầu tiên sử dụng máy bay với máy phóng. Chiếc thủy phi cơ được phóng lên để tìm kiếm tàu ngầm đối phương. Việc thu hồi máy bay trong hoàn cảnh thời tiết lúc này đối với một con tàu với kích cỡ như Pringle là một thử thách thực sự.

Vào ngày 6 tháng 2, Pringle lên đường đi sang khu vực Mặt trận Thái Bình Dương. Đi đến ngoài khơi Guadalcanal vào ngày 30 tháng 5, nó nhận nhiệm vụ tuần tra ngoài khơi khu vực quần đảo Solomon, và trong đêm 17-18 tháng 7, nó tham gia cùng các tàu khu trục WallerSaufley tấn công ba tàu khu trục Nhật Bản ngoài khơi Vanga Point, Kolombangara. Nó đã bắn trúng nhiều quả ngư lôi vào đối phương và bắn rơi một máy bay Nhật Bản.

Khi Chiến dịch quần đảo Solomon tiếp nối vào tháng 8, Pringle bảo vệ cho các đơn vị phía trước thuộc lực lượng tấn công đổ bộ lên Vella Lavella, hộ tống các tàu đổ bộ LST đi qua eo biển Gizo, vào ngày 24 tháng 8 đã bảo vệ cho các hoạt động rải mìn ngoài khơi Kolombangara dưới tầm hỏa lực pháo của đối phương. Trong đêm 3-4 tháng 9, nó cùng tàu khu trục Dyson càn quét tấn công các sà lan Nhật Bản giữa Gambi Head, Choiseul và Kolombangara, đánh chìm được ba chiếc.

Đang khi hộ tống Đội đặc nhiệm 31.7 đi vào vịnh Nữ hoàng Augusta, đảo Bougainville vào ngày 11 tháng 11, mười ngày sau cuộc đổ bộ đầu tiên lên đây, Pringle bắn rơi một máy bay đối phương và làm hư hại một chiếc khác. Nó tiếp tục hoạt động tại khu vực quần đảo Solomon trong những tháng tiếp theo, ngoại trừ một chuyến đi đến Sydney, Australia vào cuối tháng 1 năm 1944, càn quét bờ biển phía Tây Nam Bougainville vào đầu tháng 3, bắn phá các căn cứ và tàu bè sà lan đối phương. Trong Chiến dịch quần đảo Mariana và Palau diễn ra sau đó, nó làm nhiệm vụ bắn phá, tuần tra và chống tàu ngầm và trong các cuộc tấn công đổ bộ lên Saipan và Tinian, nó làm nhiệm vụ bắn pháo hỗ trợ gần. Sau đó chiếc tàu khu trục quay trở về San Francisco, California để đại tu, tái trang bị và nghỉ ngơi.

Sau khi được đại tu tại Xưởng hải quân Mare Island, Pringle khởi hành đi Trân Châu Cảng vào ngày 19 tháng 10, rồi lại lên đường từ đây vào ngày 10 tháng 11 để hướng đến Philippines, tham gia cuộc đổ bộ chiếm đóng tiếp theo. Trong các ngày 27 và 28 tháng 11, nó bắn phá các vị trí đối phương trên bờ gần vịnh Ormoc thuộc đảo Leyte, bắn rơi một máy bay đối phương cùng ngày hôm đó. Đến ngày 28 tháng 11, nó phối hợp cùng các tàu khu trục Saufley, WallerRenshaw đánh chìm tàu ngầm Nhật I-46. [3]

Pringle chịu đựng cuộc không kích ác liệt nhất khi nó hộ tống một đoàn tàu tiếp liệu đi Mindoro từ ngày 27 đến ngày 30 tháng 12 nhiều chiếc trong đoàn tàu đã bị đánh chìm, và chiếc tàu khu trục đã bắn rơi hai máy bay tấn công. Vào ngày 30 tháng 12, một máy bay tấn công cảm tử Kamikaze đã đâm vào phía sàn sau con tàu, khiến 11 người thiệt mạng và 20 người khác bị thương, phá hủy hoàn toàn một khẩu đội Bofors 40 mm và gây hư hại cho hai khẩu pháo 5 inch.

Sau khi được sửa chữa, Pringle quay trở lại hoạt động vào tháng 2 năm 1945, hộ tống các tàu vận tải đi Iwo Jima cho cuộc đổ bộ lên hòn đảo này vào ngày 17 tháng 2, rồi bắn pháo hỗ trợ cho binh lính Thủy quân Lục chiến trên bờ. Quay trở về Ulithi vào ngày 4 tháng 3, nó chuẩn bị cho cuộc đổ bộ tiếp theo lên Okinawa.

Pringle hoạt động cùng Đội khu trục 90 trong vai trò bảo vệ khu vực vận chuyển, hỗ trợ cho các tàu quét mìn cũng như hỗ trợ hỏa lực cho cuộc tấn công. Được điều sang nhiệm vụ cột mốc radar canh phòng vào ngày 15 tháng 4, nó bắn rơi hai máy bay Kamikaze vào ngày 16 tháng 4 trước khi một chiếc thứ ba đâm trúng cầu tàu và xuyên xuống sàn chính ở cấu trúc thượng tầng cạnh ống khói phía trước. Một quả bom 1.000 pound hay hai quả bom 500 pound mang theo đã xuyên qua sàn tàu và kích nổ, gây một vụ nổ lớn khiến vỡ đôi con tàu tại phòng nồi hơi phía trước. Con tàu đắm chỉ sáu phút sau đó, để lại 258 người sống sót.

Pringle được tặng thưởng mười Ngôi sao Chiến trận do thành tích phục vụ trong Thế Chiến II.


USS Pringle (DD-477) underway in December 1942

Another one of my rare or odd ships. Three destroyers during WWII were converted to carry catapult float planes. Generally these were only used on Aircraft Carriers, Battleships and Cruisers. Never on destroyers. There were some attached to merchant ships early in the war before baby flat tops and long range patrols could fight the U-boats in the Atlantic. A few launchers might have been also placed on sea plane tenders but these generally had only cranes to pick them up and place them in the water. These three destroyers used actual catapults.

Pringle was laid down by the Charleston Navy Yard , on 31 July 1941 launched on 2 May 1942, sponsored by Mrs. John D. H. Kane and commissioned on 15 September 1942, with Lieutenant Commander Harold O. Larson in command.

Pringle was one of the three Fletcher-class destroyers to be built (out of 6 planned) with a catapult for a float plane . The catapult and an aircraft crane were located just aft of the number 2 smokestack , in place of the after torpedo tube mount, 5 inch mount number 3, and the 2nd deck of the after deck house which normally carried a twin 40 mm anti-aircraft gun on most ships of the class. (The twin 40 mm mount was moved to the fantail , just forward of the depth charge racks, where most ships of the class carried 20 mm mounts.) It was intended that the float plane be used for scouting for the destroyer flotilla to which the ship was attached. It would be launched by the catapult, land on the water next to the ship, and be recovered by the aircraft crane. Pringle was the first of five ships that eventually received the catapult to use it operationally. Due to design problems with the derrick, Pringle could not recover the Kingfisher airplane. Two ships constructed in 1943, the USS Stevens and the USS Halford , had redesigned derricks. [2] Stevens became the first of the five ships to successfully launch and recover the plane. All were ultimately converted to the standard Fletcher-class configuration.

Following shakedown, Pringle joined Convoy ON-154 in mid- Atlantic 1 January 1943 to escort the Halifax -bound contingent. While on this duty she was the first U.S. destroyer to use an aircraft with catapult. The float plane was catapulted off to search for enemy submarines. Recovery of the plane in the prevailing weather for a ship the size of the Pringle was difficult.

On 6 February, she got underway for the Pacific Theater , escorting the British aircraft carrier HMS Victorious from Norfolk Navy Yard to the Pacific. Arriving off Guadalcanal on 30 May, she took up patrol duties off the Solomons , and, on the night of 17/18 July, joined Waller and Saufley in attacking three Japanese destroyers off Vanga Point , Kolombangara . Scoring several torpedo hits, she also shot down one Japanese plane.

As the Solomon Islands campaign continued into August, Pringle screened advance units of the Vella Lavella assault force, escorted LSTs through Gizo strait , and on the 24th covered minelaying operations off Kolombangara under Japanese guns. On the night of 3/4 September, Pringle with Dyson made a sweep of Japanese barges between Gambi Head , Choiseul , and Kolombangara, sinking three.

While escorting Task Group 31.7 into Empress Augusta Bay , Bougainville , on 11 November, 10 days after the initial landing there, Pringle shot down one Japanese plane and damaged another. With the exception of a run to Sydney in late January 1944, she continued to operate in the Solomons for the next few months. She swept the southwest coast of Bougainville during daylight in early March, bombarding enemy installations and beached barges.

The Marianas operation produced another long period of bombardment, screening and anti-submarine missions for Pringle. During the assaults on Saipan and Tinian , she conducted fire support operations. She then returned to San Francisco, California , for refit and to rest her crew.

After overhaul at Mare Island Naval Shipyard , Pringle sailed for Pearl Harbor on 19 October. She departed Pearl Harbor on 10 November for the Philippines to take part in the upcoming invasion. From 27 to 28 November, she bombarded enemy shore positions near Ormoc Bay , Leyte , shooting down a Japanese plane on the same day. On 28 November, she and Saufley, Waller, and Renshaw combined to sink I-46 . [3]

Pringle came under her most intense air attack while escorting a re-supply echelon to Mindoro from 27 to 30 December. Several ships in the convoy were sunk, while Pringle shot down two planes. On the 30th, a kamikaze crashed into her after deckhouse, killing 11 men and injuring 20, totally destroying one 40 mm mount and damaging two 5-inch mounts.

Back in service in February, Pringle screened transports to Iwo Jima for the assault there on the 17th, then provided fire support for the Marines ashore. Returning to Ulithi on 4 March, she prepared for the assault on Okinawa .

Operating with Destroyer Division 90 , she screened transport areas, covered minesweepers , and provided support fire. Assigned to radar picket duty on 15 April, she splashed two kamikazes on 16 April 1945 before a third crashed into her bridge, and plowed through the superstructure deck, abaft the base of number one stack. A single 1,000-pound bomb , or two 500-pounders, penetrated the main and superstructure decks and exploded with a violent eruption, buckling the keel and splitting the vessel in two at the forward fire room. Six minutes later, 258 survivors watched Pringle slide beneath the surface.


Pringle DD- 477 - History

(DD-572: dp. 2,060 l. 376'11" b. 39'8" dr. 17'9" 35 k. cpl. 329, a. 6 6", 10 21' tt., 6 dcp., 2 dct. cl.Fetcher)

Dyson (DD-672) was launched 15 April 1942 by Consolidated Steel Corp., Orange, Tex., sponsored by Mrs. Charles Wilson Dyson, widow of Rear Admiral Dyson and commissioned 30 December 1942, Commander R. Gano in command.

After escort and screening duty along the east coast and to the Caribbean, Dyson sailed from New York 14 May 1943 for the Pacific. She joined TF 36 at Noumea, and served from this base and Espiritu Santo in support of the consolidation of the Solomons, patrolling, and escorting convoys. In August she began operating in the Solomons themselves. On the night of 3-4 September in company with Pringle (DD-477) she intercepted and sank two barges and damaged another between Choiseul and Kolombangara while patrolling to block Japanese movements by water. Later that month on a similar sweep, she fired on an unidentified ship which burned and disappeared from sight.

Returning to Espiritu Santo in October 1943, Dyson with the other ships of famed Destroyer Squadron 23 sailed to cover the landings at Cape Torokina, Bougainville, and on 1 November made an attack on airfields in the Buka-Monis area and the Shortland Islands to deny their use by the Japanese to attack the Allied landings. That night in the Battle of Empress Augusta Bay, TF 39 intercepted and turned back a Japanese force sailing to attack the transports in the bay. The torpedo attacks and gunfire of Dyson and the other destroyers were a significant factor in sinking a Japanese cruiser and destroyer, and damaging four other enemy ships.

Dyson saw action in the bombardment of Buka Airdrome 17 November, and on the night of 24-26 November, took part in the classic destroyer action, the Battle off Cape St. George in which Captain A. A. Burke's destroyers sank three Japanese destroyers and severely damaged two more which were attempting to evacuate aviation personnel from the doomed Buka area to New Britain. The "Little Beavers" of Destroyer Squadron 23 won this striking victory without a casualty.

Dyson remained in the Solomons until March 1944. She continued to harass the coast of Bougainville and patrol the shipping lanes to Rabaul to prevent Japanese reinforcements from reaching the northern Solomons. In February she joined the support force for the invasion of Green Island, then made two sweeps off New Ireland hunting Japanese shipping and bombarding Kavieng. On the second of these, on 22 February the destroyers sank two cargo vessels, a destroyer minelayer, a patrol craft and two barges, and Dyson captured 31 of the 73 prisoners of war taken from Claudia Maru. On the 23d of February she pounded shore targets on Duke of York Island, and in March joined TF 31 to cover the invasion of Emirau.

Dyson joined TF 58, 26 March 1944 and screened the fast carriers during the raids on Palau, Yap, Ulithi and Woleai of 30 March to 1 April, the Hollandia operations from 21 to 23 April and the strikes on Truk, Satawan and Ponape from 29 April to 1 May. After replenishing at Majuro, she sortied with TF 58 again in June for preinvasion strikes on Saipan and Pagan and diversionary raids on the Bonins, screened the carriers during the Battle of the Philippine Sea, then began direct participation in the capture of the Marianas. She hunted Japanese shipping off Guam and Rota, bombarded gun emplacements and fired on barges.

After a west coast overhaul, Dyson joined TF 38 at Ulithi in November and took part in the strikes on Luzon, Formosa, the China coast, and the Nansei Shoto coordinated with the battle for Leyte and the invasion of Luzon. Reporting to TF 78 for duty in February 1945, she escorted convoys from San Pedro Bay to Subic Bay and patrolled and bombarded troop concentrations in the capture of Corregidor. When Saunter (AM-295) was damaged by a mine 26 February, Dyson took off her wounded and aided in the salvage operations. The destroyer continued to serve in the Philippines, taking part in the landings on Panay, Los Negros, and Mindanao Islands.

On 16 May 1945 Dyson arrived at Okinawa for patrol, radar picket, local escort, and air-sea rescue duty until the end of the war. She sailed for the States 10 September, arriving at Washington, D.C., 17 October. Two days later Secretary of the Navy, J. V. Forrestal presented Destroyer Squadron 23 with the Presidential Unit Citation for their outstanding performance in action in the Solomons in 1943-44.

Reporting to the Naval Base at Charleston, S.C., Dyson furnished electrical power for a group of decommissioned destroyers until placed out of commission in reserve 31 March 1947. On 17 February 1960, Dyson was lent to the Federal Republic of Germany, with whose navy she serves as Z-5.

In addition to her Presidential Unit Citation, Dyson received 11 battle stars for World War II service.


Pringle DD- 477 - History

On 16 Apr 45, the USS Pringle was patrolling Radar Pickett Station #14

​The USS Pringle was sunk by a Japanese Kamakaze (suicide) bomber on April 16th, 1945 during the battle of Okinawa. 320 men were on board of which 258 survived.

This page is a collection of the following which relate to that day:

  • Youtube: Video of William Herman
  • Time Magazine article The Battle of Okinawa
  • Map of Okinawa and picket stations
  • Action Report: 2 page
  • Muster Roll, April 16th 1945: 6 pages
  • Casualty Reports : 12 pages
  • Pictures of survivors: 6 pictures

Pictures of Survivors

U.S.S. Pringle Casualty Report and Casualty List - 18 April 1945

Submitted by Richard Minich (survivor) and Toni Volpe Greetis, daughter of Anthony Volpe

USS Pringle Action Reports pertaining to the sinking. The full 8 pages of action reports from the Navy can be found here.

Contributed by William L. Herman, USS Pringle survivor

  • Peter Ross Wilson, Top row, 2nd from the right in a white shirt
  • Thomas Watson Kinsey, 2nd row from the top, fifth from the left (center of the row) collared shirt with rolled up sleeves
  • John Thomas Pumroy, bottom row, far left, (white hat & T-shirt)

This picture is of the USS Pringle DD-477 Division "B" survivors. The Photo was taken on the USS Starlight AP-175, a transport ship that brought some of the Pringle survivors (except the wounded) back to San Francisco after the Pringle sank.

USS Pringle Muster Roll: April 16th, 1945

Provided by Jack Schugardt. His note at the top says:
"I have the original, this is the Muster Roll taken while in the water. I worked on this Muster Roll with Andy Balog, Bill Mundt and Claude Diehl. Bill Herman would have helped, but he was wounded and couldn't"

  • Frank Atria - Top Row, 2nd from the left
  • Howard Melvin Muggs) Hunt - Top row, 3rd in from the left
  • James Wash - Top Row, 4th from the left
  • Jack Schugardt - Top row, 2nd from the right
  • John (Jack) Carter Haldeman - Top row, far right
  • Samuel John Cardella - Top row, 4th from the right "Sammy"
  • Donald Eugene Black - 2nd row from the top, 2nd in from the left
  • Robert Cunningham - 2nd row from the top, 3rd in from the left
  • William Clarence Mundt - 2nd row from the top, 2nd from the right.
  • Claude Diehl - 3rd row from the top, 1st from the left, no shirt with the sailor derby
  • Jack Roland Gebhardt - 3rd row from the bottom, 3rd in from the left (arms folded)
  • Robert Eric DeBartolo - 4th row from the bottom and 4th in from the left
  • George Wilburn Carnley - 4th row from the bottom and 5th in from the left
  • Richard William Minich - 4th row from the bottom and 6th in from the left
  • John Franklin Berry - 4th row from the bottom and 9th in from the left
  • Jack Elmer Cruze - 3rd row from the bottom and 8th in from the left (right end)
  • Robert Daltan Hinkson. - 3rd row from the bottom, 6th in from the left
  • Eugene Ralph Smith - 2nd row down, on the far right end
  • Andrew John Balog - 4th row, 1st from the right.
  • David Wesley Hinshaw - 3rd row from bottom, 2nd in from right
  • Lloyd Grant Holderman - First row, all the way on the right
  • Nicholas Philip Capece - Bottom row, 4th in from the left (dark hair)
  • Charles Essay Jr. - Bottom row, first in from the left

Jack Schugardt, said this picture was also published in a Hazelton, PA newspaper with the following caption:
"Some of the survivors of the sinking of the USS Pringle . grateful to be alive after the brutal battle of Okinawa during World War II."

This picture is of the USS Pringle DD-477 Division "C" survivors. The Photo was taken on the USS Starlight AP-175, a transport ship that brought some of the Pringle survivors (except the wounded) back to San Francisco after the Pringle sank.

Bottom row from left to right:
Hugh A. Basset CMM, John S. Denison CEM, Gene R. Messer CPM, John B. Gifford CMM

Top row from left to right:
David K. Pope CRT, Henry F. Vogler CRM, James R. Layton CSOM, Antonio Valera CST

Not pictured:
William Durfee CES, Harold L. Still CGM, Harry U. Criss CFC

Lost:
Joe E. Wampler CMM, Tillman N. Smith CWT, Homer Sherril CTM, Wallace H. Cable

This photo of the USS Pringle Chief Petty officers (CPO's) was taken on the USS Starlight AP-175, a transport ship that brought some of the Pringle survivors (except the wounded) back to San Francisco after the Pringle sank.

There are 7 more pages worth of Action Reports, found here. The above Action Report is just regarding the sinking of the USS Pringle


Biography [ edit | edit source ]

Pringle, born in Georgetown, South Carolina, was appointed to the United States Naval Academy in 1888, and commissioned ensign in 1894. Attaining the rank of Vice Admiral in 1932, his commands included the destroyer Perkins Dixie Flotilla 2, Destroyer Force, Atlantic Fleet Melville the battleship Idaho President of the Naval War College Battleship Division 3, Battle Force and Battleships, Battle Force. For his service during World War I, he was awarded the Distinguished Service Medal for exceptionally meritorious service in a duty of great responsibility as commanding officer, Melville and Chief of Staff, Destroyer Flotillas, European Waters.

Pringle graduated from the Naval War College in 1920 and served as a staff member from 1923-1925. Subsequently, he served as the college's president from 1927-1930. He died at San Diego, California, 25 September 1932.


Watch the video: Logo History #477: Lays (May 2022).