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USS Florida BB-30 - History

USS Florida BB-30 - History


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USS Florida BB-30

Florida V

(BB-30: dp. 21,825; 1. 521'6"; b. 88'3"; dr. 28'4";
s. 21 k., cpl. 1001; a. 10 12", 16 5", 2 21" tt.;
cl. Florida)

The fifth Florida (BB-30) was launched 12 May 1910 by New York Navy Yard, sponsored by Miss E. D. Fleming, daughter of a former Florida governor, and commissioned 15 September 1911, Captain H. S. Knapp in command.

After extensive training in the Caribbean and Maine coastal waters, Florida arrived in Hampton Roads, VA. 29 March 1912 to join the Atlantic Fleet as flagship of Division l. Regularly scheduled exercises, maneuvers, fleet training and target practice, and midshipmen training cruises took the new battleship to many east coast ports and into Caribbean waters. Early in 1914 tension heightened between the United States and factions in Mexico and Florida arrived off Vera Cruz on 16 February remaining there during the ensuing occupation. She steamed to New York in July to resume regular Fleet operations and in October was transferred to Division 2.

Following United States entry into World War I, Florida completed exercises in the Chesapeake Bay and proceeded with Battleship Division 9 to join the British Grand Fleet at Scapa Flow, Orkney Islands, on 7 December 1917. She participated in the Grand Fleet's maneuvers and evolutions, and performed convoy duty with the 6th Battle Squadron through the remainder of the war. She rendezvoused with the Grand Fleet on 20 November 1918 when it met to escort the German High Seas Fleet into the Firth of Forth.

Florida joined the escort for George Washington, President Woodrow Wilson embarked, as she proceeded into Brest, France on 12 and 13 December 1918. She participated in the grand Victory Naval Review in the North River, New York City, in late December and then returned to Norfolk 4 January 1919 to resume peace time operations. During May she cruised to the Azores and took weather observations for the first aerial crossing of the Atlantic achieved that month by Navy seaplanes.

Florida's operations during the remaining years of her career were highlighted by participation in the tercentennary celebration in August 1920 of the Pilgrims' landing at Provincetown, Mass., a diplomatic voyage to South American and Caribbean ports with Secretary of State R. Lansing embarked, service as flagship for Commander, Control Force, U.S. Fleet, amphibious operations with Marines in the Caribbean, and midshipman training cruises. She was decommissioned at Philadelphia 16 February 1931 and scrapped
under the terms of the London Naval Treaty of 1930.


USS Florida (BB-30)

USS Florida (BB-30) was the lead ship of the  Florida class of dreadnought battleships of the United States Navy. She had one sister ship, Utah. Florida was laid down at the New York Navy Yard in March 1909, launched in May 1910, and commissioned into the US Navy in September 1911. She was armed with a main battery of ten 12-inch (305 mm) guns and was very similar in design to the preceding  Delaware-class battleships.

Florida was one of the first ships to arrive during the United States occupation of Veracruz in early 1914, and part of her crew joined the landing party that occupied the city. She was assigned to United States Battleship Division𔀻 after the American entrance into World War I in April 1917 the division was sent to Europe to reinforce the British Grand Fleet. During the war, Florida and the rest of her unit, reassigned as the 6th Battle Squadron of the Grand Fleet, conducted patrols in the North Sea and escorted convoys to Norway. She saw no action against the German High Seas Fleet, however.

Florida returned to normal peacetime duties in 1919. She was heavily modernized in 1924–1926, including a complete overhaul of her propulsion system. She remained in service until 1930, when the London Naval Treaty was signed. Under the terms of the treaty, Florida and Utah were removed from active service. Therefore, Florida was decommissioned in 1931 and scrapped the next year in Philadelphia.


FLORIDA BB 30

This section lists the names and designations that the ship had during its lifetime. The list is in chronological order.


    Florida Class Battleship
    Keel Laid 9 March 1909 - Launched 12 May 1910

Naval Covers

This section lists active links to the pages displaying covers associated with the ship. There should be a separate set of pages for each incarnation of the ship (ie, for each entry in the "Ship Name and Designation History" section). Covers should be presented in chronological order (or as best as can be determined).

Since a ship may have many covers, they may be split among many pages so it doesn't take forever for the pages to load. Each page link should be accompanied by a date range for covers on that page.

Postmarks

This section lists examples of the postmarks used by the ship. There should be a separate set of postmarks for each incarnation of the ship (ie, for each entry in the "Ship Name and Designation History" section). Within each set, the postmarks should be listed in order of their classification type. If more than one postmark has the same classification, then they should be further sorted by date of earliest known usage.

A postmark should not be included unless accompanied by a close-up image and/or an image of a cover showing that postmark. Date ranges MUST be based ONLY ON COVERS IN THE MUSEUM and are expected to change as more covers are added.
 
>>> If you have a better example for any of the postmarks, please feel free to replace the existing example.


Construction [ edit | edit source ]

Florida under construction the ship is undergoing her final fitting out

Florida, ordered under hull number "Battleship #30", was laid down at the New York Navy Yard on 9 March 1909. She was launched on 12 May 1910, after which fitting out work commenced. Work was finished on 15 September 1911, at which point she was commissioned into the United States Navy. Utah was ordered under hull number "Battleship #31". She was laid down in Camden, New Jersey, at the New York Shipbuilding Corporation, 6 days later on 15 March. Work proceeded faster on Utah than on her sister ship, and she was launched about four and a half months earlier, on 23 December 1909. After launching, she underwent fitting out work, which lasted until 31 August 1911, when she was commissioned into the American fleet. Ώ]


USS Florida BB-30 - History

USS Florida , lead ship of a class of two 21,825-ton battleships, was built at the New York Navy Yard. She was commissioned in September 1911 and operated in the western Atlantic and Caribbean areas for the next six years. In addition to regular fleet maneuvers, gunnery practice and training exercises, Florida took part in the U.S. intervention at Vera Cruz, Mexico in April-July 1914. In December 1917, she steamed across the Atlantic to join the British Grand Fleet at Scapa Flow and served in the North Sea for the rest of World War I. In December 1918, she escorted President Woodrow Wilson as he arrived off France, en route to participate in the post-war peace conference. Later in that month, Florida was present in New York Harbor for the Victory Fleet Review.

During the last year of the 'Teens and through the 'Twenties, Florida generally operated from the U.S. east coast down to Central America. She was given the hull number BB-30 in July 1920. Early in the decade, the battleship carried the Secretary of State on a diplomatic cruise to South America and the Caribbean. Later in the decade, she was flagship of the Control Force, U.S. Fleet. Training missions, including Naval Academy Midshipman's cruises, were also among her duties.

Florida was modernized in 1925-27, receiving heavier deck armor and anti-torpedo blisters along her sides, as well as oil-burning boilers and a rearranged secondary gun battery. Her two smokestacks were trunked into one and her "basket" mainmast was removed. The ship served but a few years in this new guise, as she had to be removed from the National armament under the terms of the 1930 London naval limitations treaty. Accordingly, USS Florida was decommissioned in February 1931 and scrapped at the Philadelphia Navy Yard later in that year.

This page features selected views concerning USS Florida (Battleship # 30, later BB-30).

If you want higher resolution reproductions than the digital images presented here, see: "How to Obtain Photographic Reproductions."

Click on the small photograph to prompt a larger view of the same image.

Dressed with flags during the Naval Review off New York City, 3 October 1911.

U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.

Online Image: 88KB 740 x 515 pixels

Photographed circa 1918, possibly while serving with the Grand Fleet in the North Sea.
Note canvas bulwark erected at her bow.

U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.

Online Image: 101KB 740 x 575 pixels

Photographed from the air, 23 April 1919.
USS Wyoming (BB-32) is in the background.

U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.

Online Image: 105KB 740 x 525 pixels

Anchored in harbor, circa 1921.

Courtesy of Gustave Maurer, ex-Chief Photographer, 1921.

U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.

Online Image: 80KB 740 x 605 pixels

Steaming in line abreast with two other ships of Battleship Division FIVE, Atlantic Fleet, during an exercise in about 1921. The other ships are USS Delaware (BB-28) and USS North Dakota (BB-29).
Photographed by A.E. Wells.

Collection of Delmar Ketch.

U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.

Online Image: 88KB 740 x 475 pixels

Gives Naval Academy Midshipmen a "taste of salt water" on their annual cruise, during the early 1920s.
She is followed by USS Delaware (BB-28) and USS North Dakota (BB-29).

U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.

Online Image: 96KB 740 x 580 pixels

Entering Halifax harbor, Nova Scotia, 1923.
She is followed by two other U.S. Navy battleships.

U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.

Online Image: 99KB 740 x 495 pixels

In Hampton Roads, Virginia, 25 October 1929.

Donation of Franklin Moran, 1967.

U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.

Online Image: 107KB 740 x 610 pixels

At Kiel, Germany, 7 July 1930, during a Midshipman's training cruise.

Official U.S. Navy Photograph, now in the collections of the National Archives.

Online Image: 113KB 740 x 595 pixels

Reproductions of this image may also be available through the National Archives photographic reproduction system.

Signalmen of the ship's Landing Force, before going ashore at Vera Cruz, Mexico, in April 1914.
These men are identified as: Windrell, Repp, C.M.M., Green and Bishop (only five listed). Note their military pistol belts with suspenders, canteens and other field gear. Several men are wearing their "flat hats" beret-style, without grommets.

Photograph and caption were provided by Chaplain C.H. Dickins, USN, 1926.

U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.

Online Image: 96KB 740 x 575 pixels

Loading drill on one of the ship's 5"/51 secondary battery guns, 1915.
Note projectile, bagged powder charge, rammer, opened gun breech mechanism, sighting telescope on left side of gun, and telephone "talker" standing near the gun. Also note that one of the guncrewmen has bare feet.

Collection of Admiral Montgomery M. Taylor, USN, 1962.

U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.

Online Image: 93KB 740 x 485 pixels

USS Florida (Battleship # 30)

Ship's crew manning the rail as USS George Washington (in background) enters Brest harbor, France, with President Woodrow Wilson on board, 13 December 1918.
Note Marines in the center foreground, and training markings painted on her 12-inch gun turret side.


USS Florida BB-30 - History

Though generally similar to the preceeding design, the two Florida class battleships were nearly two-thousand tons larger, with rearranged smokestacks and masts, wider beam, and 5"/51 secondary battery guns in place of the earlier 5"/50 type. They also were the first U.S. battleships to have steam turbine propulsion. Both Florida and Utah served in the North Sea during World War I. After that conflict, they were increasingly employed on training and other subsidiary duties, as their armament and other features had by then been thoroughly overshadowed by those of newer U.S. and foreign battleships.

Despite their obsolescence, the Florida s survived the Washington naval limitations treaty "axe" and were modernized in 1925-27. Their coal-fired boilers were replaced with oil-burning models, beam was increased to 106' by the addition of anti-torpedo "blisters", heavier deck armor was added and some of the five-inch guns were relocated to higher positions. As with other modernized battleships, their appearance changed dramatically from two smokestacks and "cage" masts to one of each.

The 1930 London treaty brought their battleship days to a swift end. Florida was decommissioned in 1931 and soon scrapped. Utah was "demilitarized" and retained as an auxiliary target ship. In the later 1930s, with the treaty system all but swept away by a worsening World political situation, she was given some five-inch and smaller guns, allowing her to serve as an anti-aircraft gunnery training ship while retaining the target mission. Armament was further increased in 1941 to enhance her utility for training, but her additional service was brief. On 7 December 1941 Utah was torpedoed and sunk by Japanese aircraft in the opening moments of the Pearl Harbor raid.

This page features a modest selection of photographs of Florida class battleships, plus images related to these ships' basic design features, and provides links to more extensive pictorial coverage of the individual ships.

For coverage of other classes of U.S. Navy battleships, see: Battleships -- Overview and Special Image Selection.

If you want higher resolution reproductions than the digital images presented here, see: "How to Obtain Photographic Reproductions."

Click on the small photograph to prompt a larger view of the same image.

Photographed circa 1914, by O.W. Waterman.
Utah 's crew are paraded on deck, wearing "whites".

Collection of Robert S. Waters, donated by his estate in 1972.

U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.

Online Image: 54KB 740 x 385 pixels

Photographed during World War I, with camouflage patterns painted on her hull and triangular baffles attached to her masts. Both were intended to confuse enemy range finders.

U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.

Online Image: 80KB 740 x 595 pixels

Anchored in harbor, circa 1921.

Courtesy of Gustave Maurer, ex-Chief Photographer, 1921.

U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.

Online Image: 80KB 740 x 605 pixels

In Hampton Roads, Virginia, 25 October 1929.

Donation of Franklin Moran, 1967.

U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.

Online Image: 107KB 740 x 610 pixels

Anchored off Long Beach, California, 18 April 1935, while serving as a target ship.
Three heavy cruisers are in the middle distance, with the city of Long Beach beyond them.

Official U.S. Navy Photograph, now in the collections of the National Archives.

Online Image: 93KB 740 x 615 pixels

Reproductions of this image may also be available through the National Archives photographic reproduction system.

Capsizing off Ford Island, during the attack on Pearl Harbor, 7 December 1941, after being torpedoed by Japanese aircraft .
Photographed from USS Tangier (AV-8), which was moored astern of Utah .
Note colors half-raised over fantail, boats nearby, and sheds covering Utah 's after guns.


USS Florida BB-30 - History

The keel of the SSBN 728 was laid on the occasion of the nation's Bicentennial, July 4, 1976, at General Dynamics' Electric Boat Division. The ship was unnamed at the keel-laying ceremony and remained that way until January 19, 1981, when the Secretary of the Navy officially assigned it the name Florida. The initial ship's crew formed the Pre-Commissioning Unit (PCU) on July 8,1980. The first shipboard watches were stationed on February 14, 1981, to support the operational control transfer of engineering systems to ship's force control.

PCU Florida was christened and launched on November 14, 1981, sponsored by Mrs. Jarcia M. Carlucci. Her reactor was initially taken critical on November 13, 1982, and she went into service and the crew moved onboard on January 21, 1983. The Ohio-class ballistic missile submarine commenced initial builders' sea trials on Feb. 21 and was subsequently delivered to the Navy on May 17, 43 days ahead of schedule. She was commissioned on June 18, 1983, with Capt. William L. Powell in command of the Blue Crew and Capt. George R. Sterner in command of the Gold Crew.

Both crews successfully completed the demonstration and shakedown operations, each culminated by the successful launch of a Trident C-4 missile. USS Florida (Gold) transited the Panama Canal in February and arrived in Bangor, Wash., on March 25, 1984.

July 25, USS Florida (Blue) returned to Bangor after completing its first, two-and-a-half month, strategic deterrent patrol.

May 21, Capt. Robert W. Boyce relieved Capt. George R. Sterner as CO of the USS Florida (Gold).

August 28, Capt. Donald M. Lachata relieved Capt. William L. Powell as commanding officer of the Blue Crew.

November 4, USS Florida (Gold) returned to Bangor after completing its 2nd, two-and-a-half month, strategic deterrent patrol.

February 11, 1985 SSBN 728 (Blue) returned home after a 75-day strategic deterrent patrol.

August 16, USS Florida (Blue) returned to Bangor after completing its 5th, two-month, strategic deterrent patrol.

February 17, 1986 USS Florida (Blue) returned to Bangor, Wash., after completing its 7th strategic deterrent patrol.

May 23, USS Florida (Gold) returned to homeport after completing its 8th, 10-week, strategic deterrent patrol.

June 14, Capt. Peter M. Galbraith relieved Capt. Robert W. Boyce as CO of the SSBN 728 (Gold).

August 14, USS Florida (Blue) successfully launched two Trident I (C4) missiles during a Follow-on Operational Test. The sub completed patrol Sept. 4.

September 24, Capt. Robert J. Labrecque relieved Capt. Donald M. Lachata as CO of the Blue Crew.

December 13, USS Florida (Gold) returned to Bangor after completing its 10th, two-and-a-half month, strategic deterrent patrol.

March 18, 1987 USS Florida (Blue) returned to homeport after completing its 11th, 10-week, strategic deterrent patrol.

June 26, SSBN 728 (Gold) returned to Bangor after completing its 12th, two-and-a-half month, strategic deterrent patrol.

October 5, USS Florida (Blue) returned to Bangor, Washington, after two-and-a-half month patrol.

January 8, 1988 USS Florida (Gold) returned to Bangor after completing its 14th, ten-week, strategic deterrent patrol.

April 12, SSBN 728 (Blue) returned to Bangor after completing its 15th, 10-week, strategic deterrent patrol.

July 22, USS Florida (Gold) returned to homeport after a 10-week strategic deterrent patrol.

September 20, Capt. Kent V. L. McNeil relieved Capt. Peter M. Galbraith as commanding officer of the Gold Crew.

November 3, USS Florida (Blue) returned home after completing its 17th, 10-week, strategic deterrent patrol.

December 16, Capt. Lyle D. Meier relieved Capt. Robert J. Labrecque as CO of the SSBN 728 (Blue).

February 10, 1989 USS Florida (Gold) returned to Bangor, Wash., after a 74-day strategic deterrent patrol.

May 9, USS Florida (Blue) returned to Bangor after completing its 19th, two-month, strategic deterrent patrol.

August 16, SSBN 728 (Gold) returned to homeport after more than a two-month strategic deterrent patrol.

November 26, USS Florida (Blue) returned to Bangor after two-and-a-half month strategic deterrent patrol.

February 26, 1990 USS Florida (Gold) returned home after completing its 22nd, two-month, strategic deterrent patrol.

April 26, Capt. George E. Keefe, Jr., relieved Capt. Kent V. L. McNeil as CO of the Florida (Gold).

June 17, USS Florida (Blue) returned to Bangor, Wash., after two-and-a-half month strategic deterrent patrol.

September 30, USS Florida (Gold) returned to homeport after completing its 24th, two-and-a-half month, strategic deterrent patrol.

January 5, 1991 USS Florida (Blue) returned to Bangor after completing its 25th, 10-week, strategic deterrent patrol.

February 21, Capt. Paul F. Sullivan relieved Capt. Lyle D. Meier as commanding officer of the Blue Crew.

March 19, The third Ohio-class ballistic missile submarine successfully conducted a Trident I Follow-on CINC Evaluation Test from a launch point in the Pacific Ocean.

April 23, SSBN 728 (Gold) returned to NSB Bangor after completing a nearly three-month strategic deterrent patrol.

August 1, USS Florida (Blue) returned home after completing its 27th, 10-week, strategic deterrent patrol.

November 11, USS Florida (Gold) returned to Bangor after two-and-a-half month strategic deterrent patrol.

February 14, 1992 USS Florida (Blue) returned to homeport after completing a nearly 10-week strategic deterrent patrol.

June 3, USS Florida (Gold) returned to Bangor after completing its 30th, two-and-a-half month, strategic deterrent patrol.

July 28, Capt. Kurt M. Trautman relieved Capt. George E. Keefe, Jr., as CO of the SSBN 728 (Gold).

September 19, USS Florida (Blue) returned to Naval Submarine Base Bangor after completing its 31st, two-and-a-half month, strategic deterrent patrol.

January 8, 1993 USS Florida (Gold) returned to Bangor after completing its 32nd, two-and-a-half month, strategic deterrent patrol.

April 25, USS Florida (Blue) returned home after completing its 33rd, two-and-a-half month, strategic deterrent patrol.

May 21, Capt. T. W. Mader relieved Capt. Paul F. Sullivan as CO of the SSBN 728 (Blue).

August 6, USS Florida (Gold) returned to Bangor after a two-month strategic deterrent patrol.

November 10, USS Florida (Blue) returned to Bangor, Wash., after completing its 35th, two-month, strategic deterrent patrol.

February 18, 1994 USS Florida (Gold) returned to homeport after completing its 36th, two-month, strategic deterrent patrol.

June 3, USS Florida (Blue) returned to Bangor after a 10-week strategic deterrent patrol.

September 16, SSBN 728 (Gold) returned to homeport after completing its 38th, 10-week, strategic deterrent patrol.

November 30, Capt. Robert G. Speer relieved Capt. Kurt M. Trautman as CO of the Gold Crew.

December 23, USS Florida (Blue) returned to Bangor, Wash., after completing its 39th strategic deterrent patrol.

The Ohio-class ballistic missile submarine successfully launched six Trident I missiles during a Follow-on CINC Evaluation Test on March 8 and 16, 1995.

May 18, USS Florida (Blue) departed Bangor for its 41st strategic deterrent patrol. The sub returned home May 20 for evalution and repair of material problem patrol aborted.

July 5, Capt. Robert G. Speer took command of the Florida (Green) during a crew-combined ceremony.

October 1, SSBN 728 (Gold) commenced the third Trident SSBN engineered overhaul (EOH) at Trident Refit Facility (TRF), Bangor, Wash. The EOH was managed by Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Bremerton.

July 5, 1996 Cmdr. Michael E. Neller took command of the Gold Crew and Capt. Robert G. Speer of the Blue, during a crew-split ceremony.

September 23, Cmdr. M. J. Alfonso relieved Capt. Robert G. Speer as CO of the Blue Crew.

October 2, USS Florida (Gold) successfully launched one C4 missile during the ship's Demonstration and Shakedown Operation (DASO). This was the final Trident I C4 DASO.

February 28, 1997 USS Florida (Gold) returned to Bangor after completing its 42nd, three-week, strategic deterrent patrol.

June 5, USS Florida (Blue) returned to Bangor, Wash., after completing its 43rd, ten-week, strategic deterrent patrol.

August 12, Cmdr. Gregory M. Billy took command of the SSBN 728 (Blue) after Rear Adm. Sullivan, Commander, Submarine Group Nine, relieved of duty Cmdr. M. J. Alfonso, due to a loss of confidence in his ability to command.

September 2, USS Florida (Gold) returned home after a nearly two-month strategic deterrent patrol.

December 22, USS Florida (Blue) returned to Bangor after a two-month, strategic deterrent patrol.

April 23, 1998 USS Florida (Gold) returned to Bangor after completing its 46th, 10-week, strategic deterrent patrol.

August 13, SSBN 728 (Blue) returned to homeport after completing its 47th, two-and-a-half month, strategic deterrent patrol.

December 3, USS Florida (Gold), returned to Naval Submarine Base Bangor after two-and-a-half month strategic deterrent patrol.

March 11, 1999 USS Florida (Blue) returned to homeport after a nearly two-month strategic deterrent patrol.

October 31, USS Florida (Blue) returned to Bangor, Wash., after completing its 51st, 10-week, strategic deterrent patrol.

February 23, 2000 USS Florida (Gold) returned to Bangor after completing its 52nd, two-month, strategic deterrent patrol.

June 14, USS Florida (Blue) returned home after completing its 53rd, two-and-a-half month, strategic deterrent patrol.

October 3, SSBN 728 (Gold) returned to NSB Bangor after completing its 54th strategic deterrent patrol.

January 25, 2001 USS Florida (Blue) returned to Bangor after completing its 55th, two-and-a-half month, strategic deterrent patrol.

March 19, Cmdr. Kevin M. Torcolini relieved Cmdr. Barry L. Bruner as commanding officer of the Gold Crew.

May 15, USS Florida (Gold) returned to homeport after a nearly two-month patrol. That was the 3,500th Strategic Deterrent Patrol by a U.S. Navy Fleet Ballistic Missile (FBM) Submarine.

June 8, Cmdr. David M. Duryea relieved Cmdr. Kevin M. Torcolini as CO of the Florida (Gold).

August 29, USS Florida (Blue) returned to Bangor after completing its 57th, 10-week, strategic deterrent patrol.

December 19, SSBN 728 (Gold) returned to homeport after completing its 58th strategic deterrent patrol.

April 8, 2002 USS Florida (Blue) returned to Bangor, Wash., after completing its 59th, nine-week, strategic deterrent patrol.

July 26, USS Florida (Gold) returned home after completing its 60th, 10-week, strategic deterrent patrol.

September 5, USS Florida (Blue) departed Bangor for its 61st and last Trident patrol.

October 25, Cmdr. David M. Duryea relieved Cmdr. Jeffrey T. Powers as CO of the USS Florida (Green) during the crew combinaton ceremony.

December 19, USS Florida (SSGN 728) arrived at its new homeport of Norfolk, Virginia. Four Ohio-class strategic missile submarines, USS Ohio (SSBN 726), USS Michigan (SSBN 727) USS Florida, and USS Georgia (SSBN 729) have been selected for transformation into a new platform, designated SSGN.

January 14-16, 2003 USS Florida successfully launched two Tomahawk cruise missiles during an SSGN Demonstration and Validation (DEMVAL) test. The successful flight tests demonstrated that Tomahawk's could be launched vertically from an Ohio-class submarine. SSGN 728 is currently off the coast of the Bahamas participating in "Giant Shadow", a Naval Sea Systems Command/Naval Submarine Forces experiment to test the capabilities of the Navy's future guided-missile submarines. The Giant Shadow is the first experiment under the "Sea Trial" initiative of the Chief of Naval Operations' Sea Power 21 vision and the first in a series of experiments before converting and overhauling the four SSBNs to SSGNs.

May 27, USS Florida arrived at Norfolk Naval Shipyard at Portsmouth, Va., for the start of a process that will change the submarine from a ballistic missile carrier into the Navy&rsquos latest and most awesome conventional weapon, the guided-missile submarine. The ship entered the Dry Dock 4 on July 8. Started Engineered Refueling Overhaul (ERO) and SSGN conversion on Aug. 1.

On August 27, at around 10:15 AM a fire broke out on the USS Florida, near the reactor compartment. According to the Nofolk Virginian-Pilot on Aug. 28, the fire was put out in 10 minutes and there was no damage to the submarine. The reactor was not in operation, as it is currently undergoing a refueling complex overhaul. The cause of the fire was not known.

April 16, 2004 Cmdr. Gregory M. Ott relieved Cmdr. David M. Duryea as CO of USS Florida during a change-of-command ceremony at Trophy Park, NNSY.

February 10, 2005 USS Florida undocked, achieving a major milestone in the overhaul and conversion process for the guided-missile submarine (SSGN) program.

March 25, 2006 The guided-missile submarine departed Norfolk Naval Shipyard for sea trials off the coast of Virginia.

April 11, SSGN 728 arrived at its new homeport of Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay, Ga., completing the sub&rsquos three-year refueling and conversion at Norfolk Naval Shipyard in Portsmouth, Va.

May 25, USS Florida returned to active service during the ceremony held in Mayport, Florida.

May 22, 2007 USS Florida launched four Tomahawk cruise missiles from the Gulf of Mexico to the Eglin Air Force Base land attack test range, May 15 to 17, during its successful Strike Operational Evaluation (OPEVAL). She launched a total of three Block IV and one Block III Tomahawk cruise missiles from a single MAC from missile tube three. Two Block IV Tomahawks were launched less than one minute apart on the first day of testing. In a first-of-its-kind demonstration.

April 26, 2008 USS Florida departed Kings Bay for its first operational deployment after undergoing conversion to SSGN. She will be deployed for approximately 12 months. The blue crew will rotate duties every three months with the gold crew, led by Capt. John Litherland, during the underway period.

May 7, The Florida moored at HMNB Gibraltar, British overseas teritory, for a routine port call.

July 21, SSGN 728 recently conducted a crew swap while docked at Naval Support Facility Diego Garcia.

February 3, 2009 Capt. Randy B. Crites relieved Capt. William F. Traub as commanding officer of the Florida (Blue), during a ceremony in Diego Garcia. Capt. Thomas M. Calabrese is CO of the Gold Crew.

April 21, The guided-missile submarine departed Souda Bay, Crete, after a four-day port visit.

May 8, USS Florida returned to homeport after a maiden deployment as guided-missile submarine. She is the first Trident-class submarine to transit the Suez Canal, Red Sea, Gulf of Aden, Strait of Hormuz, and the largest submarine ever to operate in the Persian Gulf. The ship also visited Gibraltar and Jebel Ali, United Arab Emirates.

February 16, 2010 USS Florida (Blue) departed Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay for its second SSGN deployment.

March 9, SSGN 728 pulled into Souda Bay, Greece, for a routine port call.

June 9, The Florida arrived in Diego Garcia, British Indian Ocean Teritory, for routine maintenance and a crew exchange.

January 3, 2011 Capt. Gregory M. Ott relieved Capt. Randy B. Crites as CO of USS Florida (Blue) during a change-of-command ceremony at Navy Support Facility (NSF) Diego Garcia.

March 4, The guided-missile submarine pulled into Naples, Italy, for a brief port viist.

March 7, USS Florida arrived in Souda Bay, Greece, for a routine port call.

March 19, The Florida (Gold) launched Tomahawk Land Attack Missiles (TLAMs), after 8 p.m. local time in the Mediterranean Sea, in support of Operation Odyssey Dawn.

April 8, SSGN 728 moored at HMNB Gibraltar for a port visit to British overseas teritory.

April 29, USS Florida returned to Kings Bay after a 14-month deployment in the U.S. 5th and 6th Fleet AoR. The submarine launched more than 90 TLAMs in support of OOD.

May 5, Capt. David Kirk relieved Capt. Thomas Calabrese as CO of the Florida (Gold) during a change-of-command ceremony at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay.

July 21, SSGN 728 is currently in dry-dock at Trident Refit Facility (TRF) for routine maintenance.

June 18, 2012 USS Florida (Blue) pulled into Souda Bay, Greece, for a week-long port call. The guided-missile submarine recently departed Kings Bay, Ga., for its third SSGN patrol.

August 17, The Florida arrived at Navy Support Facility (NSF) Diego Garcia for routine maintenance and a crew exchange.

October 5, Capt. Owen M. Travis relieved Capt. Gregory M. Ott as CO of the USS Florida (Blue) during a change-of-command ceremony at NSB Kings Bay.

November 25, USS Florida (Gold) arrived in Diego Garcia, British Indian Ocean Teritory, for upkeep and a crew exchange.

May 21, 2013 SSGN 728 (Gold) arrived in Naval Support Activity Souda Bay in Crete, Greece, for a three-day port call. Brief stop in Augusta Bay, Sicily, on May 29.

June 17, USS Florida returned to NSB Kings Bay after more than a 12-month deployment in the U.S. 5th and 6th Fleet AoR.

July 3, The Florida (Blue) departed homeport for routine operations.

July 19, Capt. Louis E. Mayer, IV relieved Capt. David Kirk as CO of the USS Florida (Gold) during a change-of-command ceremony at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Chapel.

August 28, 2014 USS Florida returned to Kings Bay following routine operations.

October ?, USS Florida (Blue) departed Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay for its fourth patrol as a guided-missile submarine.

November 5, The Florida arrived in Naval Support Activity Souda Bay, Greece, for a routine port call.

January 26, 2015 Capt. Nathan H. Martin relieved Capt. Owen M. Travis as CO of the USS Florida (Blue) during a change-of-command ceremony at Bravo Wharf on Navy Support Facility (NSF) Diego Garcia. SSGN 728 recently arrived for a routine port call and a crew exchange.

June 26, Capt. William C. McKinney relieved Capt. Louis E. Mayer, IV as CO of the Florida (Gold) during a change-of-command ceremony at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Chapel.

January 7, 2016 USS Florida (Gold) moored outboard the USS Emory S. Land (AS 39) at Bravo Wharf, Navy Support Facility Diego Garcia, for a two-week Fleet Maintenance Availability (FMAV) and to conduct crew exchange.

April 3, The Florida (Blue) made a brief stop in Souda Bay, Crete Moored at West Berth K14 in Souda Bay for a crew exchange from April 5-10 Brief stop at South Mole on HM Naval Base Gibraltar, British overseas teritory, on April 16.

April 29, USS Florida moored at Explosive Handling Wharf #2 on Naval submarine Base Kings Bay following an extended 18-month patrol.

December 12, Capt. Brett D. Moyes relieved Capt. Nathan H. Martin as CO of the SSGN 728 (Blue) during a change-of-command ceremony at the Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay's chapel.

March 31, 2017 USS Florida recently undocked from Trident Refit Facility (TRF) after an eight-month maintenance period.

September 22, Capt. Gregory R. Kercher relieved Capt. William C. McKinney as CO of the Florida (Gold) during a change-of-command ceremony on Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay.

February 26, 2018 USS Florida departed Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay for its fifth SSGN deployment.

March 1?, The guided-missile submarine transited the Strait of Gibraltar eastbound Transited the Suez Canal southbound, escorted by USS Laboon (DDG 58), on March 18.

August 31, Vice Adm. Charles A. Richard, Commander, U.S. Submarine Forces relieved of duty Capt. Gregory Kercher due to a "loss of confidence in his ability to command." Capt. Michael G. Badorf assumed temporary command of the USS Florida (Gold).

March 8, 2019 SSGN 728 (Gold), commanded by Capt. Seth Burton, transited the Suez Canal northbound, escorted by USS McFaul (DDG 74) Moored at West Berth K14 in Souda Bay, Crete, from March 14-22.

May 3, USS Florida (Gold) moored at Berth K14 in Souda Bay for a crew exchange Brief stop in Souda Bay for personnel transfer on Aug. 27 Moored at Berth K14 again from Sept. 7- Oct. 4.

October 15, The Florida (Gold) made a brief stop in Souda Bay, Crete, to embark guests for a one-day VIP cruise Brief stop in Souda Bay on Nov. 7 and 25th Moored at Berth K14 on Dec. ?.

December 24, USS Florida moored at Berth 50, South Mole in Her Majesty's Naval Base (HMNB) Gibraltar, British overseas teritory, for a six-day port visit Transited the Suez Canal southbound, escorted by USS Ross (DDG 71), on Jan. 12.?

April 17, 2020 The Florida transited the Suez Canal northbound, escorted by USS Truxtun (DDG 103) Brief stop in Souda Bay, Crete, to resupply on April 20 Moored at Berth 1/2, Pier 1 on Naval Station Rota, Spain, from April 26-27.

May 9, USS Florida (Blue), commanded by Capt. Brian L. Tothero, moored at Explosive Handling Wharf #2 on Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay following an extended 26-and-a-half month deployment in the U.S. 5th and 6th Fleet AoR.

June 12, Capt. Theron C. Davis relieved Capt. Seth Burton as CO of the Florida (Gold) during a change-of-command ceremony on Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay.


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USS Florida BB-30 - History

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Inter-War Period

Florida joined the escort for SS George Washington, President Woodrow Wilson embarked, as she proceeded into Brest, France on 12–13 December. She participated in the Victory Naval Review in the North River, New York City in late December and then returned to Norfolk, Virginia on 4 January 1919 to resume peace time operations. In May, she cruised to the Azores and took weather observations for the first aerial crossing of the Atlantic, to be made by Navy seaplanes.

Florida ' s operations during the remaining years of her career were highlighted by participation in the tercentenary celebration in August 1920 of the Pilgrims' landing at Provincetown, Massachusetts, a diplomatic voyage to South American and Caribbean ports with Secretary of State Robert Lansing embarked, service as flagship for Commander, Control Force, US Fleet, amphibious operations with Marines in the Caribbean, and midshipman training cruises.

Florida was laid up in June 1924. She was modernized at the Boston Navy Yard from 1 April 1925-1 November 1926. The reconstruction included: Heavier deck armor, anti-torpedo blisters along her sides, and a rearranged secondary gun battery. The four boilers were converted from coal fired to White-Forster oil fired. Her two smokestacks were trunked into one. The aft caged mast was replaced with a lower stick mast and relocated aft between Turrets 3 & 4. Four of the 16 5 inch (127 mm)/51 cal secondary battery [ 2 ] mounted in sponsons in the hull were removed. The two 21 in (530 mm) underwater mounted torpedo tubes were also removed.

The ship only served a few years in this new guise, as she had to be removed from the fleet to comply with the terms of the London Naval Treaty of 1930. Therefore, she was decommissioned on 16 February 1931 at the Philadelphia Naval Yard, stricken from the Naval Vessel Register on 6 April 1932 and scrapped at the Philadelphia Naval Yard on 30 September 1932.

The silver service for Florida is currently on permanent display in the State Dining Room of the Florida Governor's Mansion. The ship's bell is displayed in Ben Hill Griffin Stadium at the University of Florida. The ship's bridge wheel and builder's model are displayed in the lobby of the Museum of Florida History.


Watch the video: USS Florida - Guide 119 (June 2022).


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