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Osage I monitor - History

Osage I monitor - History



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Osage I
(Mon: t. 523, 1. 180', b. 45', dph. 9', dr. 4'6"; s. 7.5 k., cpl.100; a. 2 11" D.sb.; cl. Neosho)

The first Osage, a single-turreted river monitor, was launched 13 January 1863 by James B. Eads at his Union Iron Works, Carondelet, Mo., and commissioned at Cairo, Ill. 10 July 1863, Aeting Vol. Lt. Joseph P. Couthany in command.

She sailed from Cairo for patrol duty in the Red River, and participated in the expedition up the Black and Washita Rivers, 29 February to 5 March 1864, She also participated in the expedition up the Red River to Alexandria, La., 12 March to 22 May and assisted in the capture of Fort De Russy, La. 14 March.

Transferred to the West Gulf Blockading Squadron 1 Feb wary 1865, Osage participated in the attack on Spanish Fort Mobile, Ala, 28 March 1865. The next day she was sunk by a torpedo in the Blakely River, Ala. Her hulk was raised and sold at auction at New Orleans 22 November 1867.


USS Osage


Osage, a single-turreted river monitor, was launched 13 January 1863 by James B. Eads at his Union Iron Works, Carondelet, Missouri and commissioned at Cairo, Illinois on 10 July 1863, Acting Vol. Lt. Joseph P. Couthany in command.

She sailed from Cairo for patrol duty in the Red River, and participated in the expedition up the Black and Washita Rivers, 29 February to 5 March 1864. She also participated in the expedition up the Red River to Alexandria, Louisiana, 12 March to 22 May and assisted in the capture of Fort De Russy on 14 March.

Transferred to the West Gulf Blockading Squadron 1 February 1865, Osage participated in the attack on Spanish Fort, Mobile, Alabama on 28 March 1865. The next day she was sunk by a torpedo in the Blakely River. Her hulk was raised and sold at auction at New Orleans 22 November 1867.

This article incorporates text from the Dictionary of American Naval Fighting Ships, a work in the public domain.


Osage Indians

The following is a little history of the Osage Indians. The Osage Indians were originally located in Missouri near the Missouri and Osage rivers. They were first discovered by French explorers around 1673. The Osage Indians are a seminomadic tribe. They were known for gardening, hunting, and foraging. Eventually, they found themselves in the northwestern part of Arkansas.

The United States government started to take away land from the Osage Indians in 1808. A reservation was formed for the Osage Indians in Southern Kansas in 1825. As with many other tribes they were relocated to Oklahoma. Many Osage Indians still live in Oklahoma around the Pawhuska area.

The Osage Indians hunted small game, elk, deer, bear, and bison. While the men of the Osage were responsible for the hunting, the women would butcher and prepare the meat by drying or smoking methods. They would also work with the hides. The women also gathered plants that grew in the area. With the extra produce and meat, the Osage Indians would trade items with the Europeans and other Indians.

The men of the Osage Indians wore a scalplock with the rest of the head shaved. The clan a man belonged to could be distinguished by the pattern of their scalplock. The men wore clothing that consisted of loincloths made from deerskin, moccasins, and leggings. To protect them against cold weather they would occasionally wear bearskin or buffalo robes. Beaded jewelry was also worn as well as tattoos. These tattoos where mostly located on the chest.

Women's clothing was also made of deerskin and consisted of dresses, moccasins, belts, and leggings. They wore their hair long and also wore jewelry and tattoos. The women of the Osage Indians also used columbine seed to perfume their clothing. Puma and Ermine furs decorated their ceremonial garments.


Carlisle Cavern of Carnage

Career
Ordered:
Builder: Union Iron Works, Carondelet, Missouri
Laid down: 1862
Launched: 13 January 1863
Commissioned: 10 July 1863
Decommissioned: 23 July 1865 at Mound City, Illinois
Fate: Sunk by mine, 29 March 1865 Raised and sold, 22 November 1867

General Characteristics
Type: River monitor
Area of Operation: Mississippi River
Displacement: 523 tons
Length: 180 feet (55 m)
Beam: 45 ft (14 m)
Draft: 4 feet 6 inches (1.37 m)
Propulsion: Steam engine / Paddlewheel
Speed: 7.5 knots
Complement: 100 Officers and crew
Armament:
2 × 11 in (280 mm) Dahlgren smoothbore guns
Armor: Iron plate

The first USS Osage was a single-turreted Neosho-class river monitor named after the American Indian tribe living in the Missouri area (at that time).

Osage was launched 13 January 1863 by James Buchanan Eads at his Union Iron Works, Carondelet, Missouri, and commissioned at Cairo, Illinois on 10 July 1863, Acting Volunteer Lt. Joseph Pitty Couthouy in command.

Osage and her sister-ship Neosho were the first of Eads’ river warships to employ the “turtleback” design which became his hallmark and were the only monitors to be propelled by stern wheels. Their shallow draft made them extremely useful in the riverine warfare to come.

Service history
She sailed from Cairo for patrol duty in the Red River, and participated in the expedition up the Black, Ouachita, and Washita Rivers, 29 February to 5 March 1864. She also participated in the expedition up the Red River to Alexandria, Louisiana, 12 March to 22 May and assisted in the capture of Fort DeRussy on 14 March.

Transferred to the West Gulf Blockading Squadron on 1 February 1865, Osage participated in the attack on Spanish Fort, Alabama, near Mobile on 28 March 1865. The next day she was sunk by a torpedo in the Blakely River. Her hulk was raised and sold at auction at New Orleans on 22 November 1867.


The forgotten murders of the Osage people for the oil beneath their land

David Grann’s true crime tale “Killers of the Flower Moon: The Osage Murders and the Birth of the FBI” is our second pick for the PBS NewsHour-New York Times book club, “Now Read This.” Become a member of the book club by joining our Facebook group, or by signing up for our newsletter. For an FAQ on how book club works, see here. Below, Grann recounts the history of the Osage Nation, and why they began to be mysteriously murdered off, in a photo essay.

In the early 20th century, the members of the Osage Nation became the richest people per capita in the world, after oil was discovered under their reservation, in Northeast Oklahoma. Then they began to be mysteriously murdered off. The case became one of the FBI’s first major homicide investigations.

In telling this largely forgotten history in my new book, “Killers of the Flower Moon: The Osage Murders and the Birth of the FBI,” I drew on many archival and contemporary photographs to help document what happened. Here are some of the most powerful images.

In the early 1870s, the Osage had been driven from their lands in Kansas onto a rocky, presumably worthless reservation in northeastern Oklahoma.

An early Osage camp on the reservation:

This land, it turned out, was sitting above some of the largest oil deposits then in the United States. To extract that oil, prospectors had to pay the two thousand or so Osage for leases and royalties. In 1923, these Osage received collectively what would be worth today more than $400 million. Many of the Osage lived in mansions and had chauffeured cars.

Then the Osage began to die under mysterious circumstances. The family of Mollie Burkhart, an Osage woman, became a prime target.

In the spring of 1921, Mollie’s older sister, Anna, disappeared.

A week later, Anna was found in this ravine, shot in the back of the head.

Less than two months after Anna’s murder, Mollie’s mother, Lizzie, died. Evidence would later suggest that she had been poisoned.

Mollie had a younger sister named Rita.

Rita was so frightened by these killings that she moved with her husband closer to town. Their house, where a maid also lived, was not far from Mollie’s.

Late one evening in March 1923, Mollie was woken by a loud explosion. She got up and went to her window and looked in the direction of her sister’s house, and all she saw was an orange ball rising into the sky. Somebody had planted a bomb under her sister’s house, killing Rita and her husband as well as the maid.

And it wasn’t just Mollie’s family that was being targeted. Other Osage were being systematically murdered, and several of those who tried to catch the killers were also killed. One attorney, W.W. Vaughan, was thrown off a speeding train.

In 1923, after the official death toll had climbed to more than two dozen, the Osage Tribal Council issued a resolution demanding that federal authorities investigate the murders. And the case was eventually taken up by the Bureau of Investigation, then an obscure branch of the Justice Department, which was later renamed the Federal Bureau of Investigation.

The Bureau initially badly bungled the investigation. Agents released Blackie Thompson, a notorious outlaw, from jail, hoping to use him as an informant. Instead, he robbed a bank and killed a police officer. Thompson would later be gunned down himself.

J. Edgar Hoover had been appointed acting director of the Bureau in 1924. He was 29 years old, and he feared the potential scandal from the bureau’s handling of the Osage case could undermine his dreams of building a bureaucratic kingdom.

In 1925, in desperation, he brought in a field agent named Tom White to take over the case.

White was a former Texas Ranger and an old frontier lawman, and he put together an undercover team, including an American Indian agent. One of the agents posed as an insurance salesman others pretended to be cattlemen.

By following the money to see who was profiting from the murders, White and his team were able to capture some of the killers. But one of the things I try to document in the book is that there was a much deeper and darker conspiracy that the bureau never exposed. As Mary Jo Webb, a retired Osage teacher, told me, “This land is saturated with blood.”


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This form is used as part of the mortgage process, as described in 52 IAM 4-H. (Word version only)

This form is used as part of the mortgage process, as described in 52 IAM 4-H. (Word version only)

This form is used as part of the mortgage process, as described in 52 IAM 4-H. (Word version only)

This form is used as part of the mortgage process, as described in 52 IAM 4-H. (Word version only)

This form is used as part of the mortgage process, as described in 52 IAM 4-H. (Word version only)

This form is used as part of the mortgage process, as described in 52 IAM 4-H. (Word version only)

This form is used as part of the mortgage process, as described in 52 IAM 4-H. (Word version only)

This form is used as part of the mortgage process, as described in 52 IAM 4-H. (Word version only)

This form is used as part of the mortgage process, as described in 52 IAM 4-H. (Word version only)

This form is used as part of the mortgage process, as described in 52 IAM 4-H. (Word version only)

This form is used as part of the mortgage process, as described in 52 IAM 4-H. (Word version only)

This form is used as part of the mortgage process, as described in 52 IAM 4-H. (Word version only)

This form is used as part of the mortgage process, as described in 52 IAM 4-H. (Word version only)

This form is used as part of the mortgage process, as described in 52 IAM 4-H. (Word version only)

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About the Author

&bull Where&mdashNew York, New York, USA

&bull Education&mdashB.A., Connecticut College M.A., Tufts University M.A., Boston University

&bull Currently&mdashlives in New York, New York

David Grann is a staff writer at The New Yorker. Grann's first book, The Lost City of Z, was a New York Times bestseller and has been translated into more than twenty-five languages. Shortlisted for the Samuel Johnson Prize, England's most prestigious nonfiction award, The Lost City of Z was chosen as one of the best books of 2009 by countless newspapers and magazines, including the New York Times, Washington Post, Entertainment Weekly, Bloomberg, Publisher's Weekly, and Christian Science Monitor. The book was adapted to film in 2016.

Killers of the Flower Moon, about the murder of the Osage Indians during the 1920s and the birth of the modern F.B.I. under J. Edgar Hoover.

At The New Yorker, Grann has written about everything from the mysterious death of the world's greatest Sherlock Holmes expert to the hunt for the giant squid, from the perilous maze of water tunnels under New York to a Polish writer who may have left clues to a real murder in his postmodern novel. Grann is also author of a 2010 collection of stories, The Devil and Sherlock Holmes: Tales of Murder, Madness, and Obsession.

Grann&rsquos stories have also appeared in The Best American Crime Writing (2004, 2005, and 2009), The Best American Sports Writing (2003 and 2006) and The Best American Nonrequired Reading (2009). As a finalist for the Michael Kelly award for the &ldquofearless pursuit and expression of truth,&rdquo Grann has also written for the New York Times Magazine, The Atlantic, Washington Post, Boston Globe, Wall Street Journal, Weekly Standard, and New Republic.

Before joining The New Yorker in 2003, Grann was a senior editor at The New Republic, and, from 1995 until 1996, the executive editor of the newspaper The Hill. He holds master&rsquos degrees in international relations from the Fletcher School of Law & Diplomacy as well as in creative writing from Boston University. After graduating from Connecticut College in 1989, he received a Thomas Watson Fellowship and did research in Mexico, where he began his career in journalism. He currently lives in New York with his wife and two children. (From the author's website.)


Watch the video: Osage History and Culture with Susan Shannon and Margaret Sisk and special guest Janae Collins (August 2022).