The story

Bladen APA-63 - History

Bladen APA-63 - History


We are searching data for your request:

Forums and discussions:
Manuals and reference books:
Data from registers:
Wait the end of the search in all databases.
Upon completion, a link will appear to access the found materials.

Bladen

Bladen

(APA-63: dp. 4247; 1. 426'; b. 58'; dr. 16'; s. 16.9 k.;
cpl. 320; a. 1 5"; cl. Gilliam)

Bladen (APA-63) was launched 31 May 1944 by Consolidated Steel Corp., Ltd., Wilmington, Calif., under a Maritime Commission contract; sponsored by Mrs. John McNerney; acquired by the Navy 17 October 1944; and commissioned 18 October 1944, Lieutenant Commander W. P. Hartung, USNR, in command.

Bladen departed the west coast for Pearl Harbor 20 November 1944 and upon arrival embarked personnel of the 103rd and 109th Construction Battalions for Guam. Returning to Pearl Harbor 13 January 1945 the ship commenced combat loading and training maneuvers. On 27 January she set sail for Iwo Jima, via Saipan. The attack transport debarked troops and provided logistic support during the assault and occupation of Iwo Jima (19-28 February).

After a brief layover at Saipan, Bladen prepared for the invasion of Okinawa. She performed her logistic services during the initial strikes against, and occupation of I Okinawa (1-10 April). In the middle of April she returned to Saipan where she remained at anchor for six weeks. On 4 June she got underway for Tulagi, Solomon Islands, and thence to Noumea, New Caledonia. She returned to San Francisco 21 July for a brief yard period.

With a passenger list of army and naval personnel, Bladen sailed 8 August for Pearl Harbor, Eniwetok, and Ulithi. She then steamed to the Philippines where she remained until 20 September. She next transported army personnel and equipment to Wakayama, Honshu, Japan. On 26 September she departed Wakayama and returned to the Philippines. She made another trip to Japan before getting underway for San Francisco, where she arrived 23 November. In December she made a return voyage to the Philippines. On 22 January 1946 she proceeded to Pearl Harbor where she remained until 18 May undergoing preparations for Operation Crossroads. She participated in the operation at Bikini between 31 May and 30 August 1946. Bladen departed Kwajalein Atoll 30 August for San Francisco, where she arrived 13 September.

Bladen departed the west coast I November and steamed to Norfolk. Upon arrival she reported for Inactivation and was decommissioned 26 December 1946. She was transferred to the Maritime Commission .3 August 1953.

Bladen received two battle stars for World War II service.


APA Style originated in 1929, when a group of psychologists, anthropologists, and business managers convened and sought to establish a simple set of procedures, or style guidelines, that would codify the many components of scientific writing to increase the ease of reading comprehension. They published their guidelines as a seven-page article in Psychological Bulletin describing a “standard of procedure, to which exceptions would doubtless be necessary, but to which reference might be made in cases of doubt” (Bentley et al., 1929, p. 57).

Since then, the scope and length of the Publication Manual have grown in response to the needs of researchers, students, and educators across the social and behavioral sciences, health care, natural sciences, humanities, and more however, the spirit of the original authors’ intentions remains.


&bull Laid down, 24 January 1944, as a Maritime Commission type (S4-SE2-BD1) hull, under Maritime Commission contract, (MC hull 1853) at Consolidated Steel Corp, Wilmington CA.
&bull Launched, 3 May 1944
&bull Acquired by the Navy from the Maritime Commission, 15 September 1944
&bull Commissioned USS Banner (APA-60) , 16 September 1944, LCDR. James R. Page in command
&bull During World War II USS Banner was assigned to the Asiatic-Pacific Theater: TransRon Fourteen , COMO. D. L. Ryan USN (16) TransDiv Forty-One , CAPT. H.J. Wright USN and participated in two campaigns.
&bull Following World War II USS Banner was assigned to Occupation service in the Far East from 19 to 27 September 1945
&bull USS Banner (APA-60) was assigned to Joint Task Force 1, Task Unit 1.2.6 (Target Vessel Group - Merchant Type Units - Transport Division 91 (TRANSDIV 91) for Operation Crossroads the atomic bomb tests at Bikini Atoll in July 1946
&bull Decommissioned at Bikini Atoll, 27 August 1946
&bull Struck from the Naval Register, 12 March 1948
&bull USS Banner earned two battle stars for her World War II service
Final Disposition, scuttled off Kwajalein, 16 February 1948

&bull Laid down, 28 January 1944, as a Maritime Commission type (S4-SE2-BD1) hull under Maritime Commission contract (MC hull 1854) at Consolidated Steel Corp, Wilmington, CA.
&bull Launched, 11 May 1944
&bull Acquired by the Navy from the Maritime Commission 27 September 1944
&bull Commissioned USS Barrow (APA-61) , 28 September 1944, LCDR. Herman Jorgensen, USNR, in command
&bull During World War II USS Barrow was assigned to the Asiatic-Pacific Theater: TransRon Fifteen , CAPT. W. S. Popham USN (14) TransDiv Forty-Five , CAPT. A.C.J. Sabalot USN (20) and participated in two campaigns.
&bull USS Barrow (APA-61) was assigned to Joint Task Force 1, Task Unit 1.2.6 (Target Vessel Group - Merchant Type Units - Transport Division 92 (TRANSDIV 92) for Operation Crossroads the atomic bomb tests at Bikini Atoll in July 1946
&bull Decommissioned at Bikini Atoll, 28 August 1946
&bull Struck from the Naval Register, 28 May 1948
&bull USS Barrow earned two battle stars for World War II service
&bull Final Disposition, scuttled off Kwajalein, 11 May 1948


Bladen APA-63 - History

From: Dictionary of American Naval Fighting Ships

Bladen is a county in North Carolina.

(APA-63: dp. 4247 l. 426 b. 68' dr. 16' s. 16.9 k. cpl. 320 a. 1 5" cl. Gilliam )

Bladen (APA-63) was launched 31 May 1944 by Consolidated Steel Corp., Ltd., Wilmington, Calif., under a Maritime Commission contract sponsored by Mrs. John McNerney acquired by the Navy 17 October 1944 and commissioned 18 October 1944, Lieutenant Commander W. P. Hartung, USNR, in command.

Bladen departed the west coast for Pearl Harbor 20 November 1944 and upon arrival embarked personnel of the 103rd and 109th Construction Battalions for Guam. Returning to Pearl Harbor 13 January 1945 the ship commenced combat loading and training maneuvers. On 27 January she set sail for Iwo Jima, via Saipan. The attack transport debarked troops and provided logistic support during the assault and occupation of Iwo Jima (19-28 February).

After a brief layover at Saipan, Bladen prepared for the invasion of Okinawa. She performed her logistic services during the initial strikes against, and occupation of, Okinawa (1-10 April). In the middle of April she returned to Saipan where she remained at anchor for six weeks. On 4 June she got underway for Tulagi, Solomon Islands, and thence to Noumea, New Caledonia. She returned to San Francisco 21 July for a brief yard period.

With a passenger list of army and naval personnel, Blade sailed S August for Pearl Harbor, Eniwetok, and Ulithi. She then steamed to the Philippines where she remained until 20 September. She next transported army personnel and equipment to Wakayama, Honshu, Japan. On 26 September she departed Wakayama and returned to the Philippines. She made another trip to Japan before getting underway for San Francisco, where she arrived 23 November. In December she made a return voyage to the Philippines. On 22 January 1946 she proceeded to Pearl Harbor where she remained until 18 May undergoing preparations for Operation Crossroads. She participated in the operation at Bikini between 31 May and 30 August 1946. Bladen departed Kwajalein Atoll 30 August for San Francisco, where she arrived 13 September.

Bladen departed the west coast 1 November and steamed to Norfolk. Upon arrival she reported for inactivation and was decommissioned 26 December 1946. She was transferred to the Maritime Commission 3 August 1953.


Bladen County History

Bladen County was founded in 1734 and named for Martin Bladen, a member of the Board of Trade. Bladen County was formed as Bladen Precinct of Bath County. With the abolition of Bath County in 1739, all of its constituent precincts became counties.

Originally, Bladen was a vast territory with indefinite northern and western boundaries. Reductions in its extent began in 1750, when its western part became Anson County. In 1792 the northern part of Bladen County was combined with Granville County and Johnston County to form Orange County. In 1754 the northern part of what was left of Bladen County became Cumberland County.

In 1764 the southern part of what remained of Bladen County was combined with part of New Hanover County to form Brunswick County. In 1787 the western part of the now much smaller county became Robeson County. Finally, in 1808 the southern part of Bladen County was combined with part of Brunswick County to form Columbus County.

Bladen County is considered the “mother county” of North Carolina because of the 100 counties in North Carolina, 55 of them at one point belonged to Bladen County.

The county consist of 887 square miles. Included are 874 square miles of land and 13 square miles of water. There are about 40 people per square mile in Bladen County, the fourth largest county in North Carolina by land area.

Elizabethtown is the county seat and was named for Queen Elizabeth I. Other incorporated towns in the county include Bladenboro (1903), Clarkton, Dublin, East Arcadia, Tar Heel and White Lake.


Bladen APA-63 - History

Bladen County, North Carolina


Genealogy and History
Volunteers Dedicated to Free Genealogy

Welcome to North Carolina Genealogy Trails!

Our goal is to help you track your ancestors through time by transcribing genealogical and historical data and placing it online for the free use of all researchers

If you have a love for history, a desire to help others, and basic webpage-making skills, consider joining us! Get the details on our Volunteer Page .
[A desire to transcribe data and knowledge of how to make a basic webpage is required.]

If hosting isn't for you, we can use your help in other ways.
More information can be found on the Volunteer Page .

This site is available for adoption!

Join our Mailing Lists to be notified of updates!

We regret that we are unable to do personal research for anyone..
All data we come across will be added to this site.
We thank you for visiting and hope you'll come back again to view the updates we make to this site


Happy Trails to you on your quest for your ancestors.

Check your attics!
Dust off your family scrapbooks!
We're looking for DATA for this site.

If you would like to submit data for this site,
please Email Us with your submissions.


Bladen APA-63 - History

  • home Home
  • flag Start Here
  • Navigation Tips
  • What's New?
  • The Inside Story
  • Dedication
  • Stories
  • Bulletin Board
  • Web Tech
  • Team Elmore
  • Contact Us
  • The Ship
  • 42 Overview
  • What Is an APA?
  • APA Classes
  • APAs
  • Higgins Boat
  • Blueprints
  • Perspectives
  • Modern Amphibs
  • Weapons
  • GE Turbine
  • Elmore Post-War
  • people The Crew
  • Remembrance
  • Survivors
  • Crew List
  • Officer List
  • Passengers
  • Crew Photos
  • Shipboard
  • Memorabila
  • Recollections
  • Reunions
  • The Logs
  • Battle Stars
  • Timelines
  • War Diary
  • Deck Logs
  • Ship's History
  • Life Aboard a Transport
  • Nice to Have You Aboard
  • The War Effort
  • Pacific Fleet
  • Admirals
  • Nimitz
  • Halsey
  • Turner
  • MacArthur
  • MacArthur Biography
  • Man of the People
  • The Truth Behind the Photograph
  • MacArthur's Navy
  • MacArthur Mini-Bio
  • Marines
  • Army
  • Homefront
  • Magic Carpet
  • The Pacific War
  • Overview
  • Strategy
  • Pacific War
  • Pacific Islands
  • Ulithi
  • Guam
  • Tokyo Rose
  • Magic
  • Kamikaze Main
  • Suicide Squad
  • Ten Facts
  • Divine Wind
  • Baka
  • USS DuPage
  • USS LaGrange
  • The Atomic Bomb
  • Graphical View
  • A-Bomb Timeline
  • The Bomb
  • Bombs Compared
  • Justified?
  • Surrender
  • Occupation
  • Matsuyama
  • Wakayama
  • Commentaries
  • Joe Rosenthal
  • Maps
  • Maps 1
  • Maps 2
  • Photos
  • Ship Photos
  • War Photos
  • Videos
  • Video 1
  • Video 2
  • Video 3
  • Video 4
  • Resources
  • Recommended Books
  • Book List 1
  • Book List 2
  • Book List 3
  • Book List 4
  • Book List 5
  • Book List 6
  • Book List 7
  • Book List 8
  • All Hands
  • All Hands 1942
  • All Hands 1943
  • All Hands 1944
  • All Hands 1945
  • All Hands 1946
  • War Posters
  • Museums
  • Other Websites
  • search Search
  • question_answer Contact Us

Recommended Reading List 3

First-Hand Narratives - The best way to truly understand what it was like to serve aboard an Attack Transport (or other ship) in the Pacific theater is to read the personal memoirs of those officers and sailors who served on such ships during World War II.

Bell Bottom Trousers: Life aboard an Attack Transport in the Pacific during World War Two

This story tells of the experiences of a young sailor during World War II, aboard an Attack Transport in the Pacific theater, USS President Adams (APA-19). For the first time in our history we would be fighting a two-front conflict. The war fronts were widely separated and would require different types of fighting and planning. Europe would require a large scale amphibious attack (the Normandy landings) because most of the continent was held by the enemy. But in the Pacific theater, with its many islands, both large and small, the conditions necessitated an almost continuous amphibious war, for which we were not prepared. Neither we nor our Allies possessed suitable landing craft for large-scale amphibious operations of this type. Fortunately, Andrew J. Higgins had developed a prototype landing craft that would win the war for the Allies--- the famed Higgins boats of World War II.

But as good as these landing craft might be, they could not cross oceans or other large bodies of water under their own power. These boats required mother ships (transports and cargo ships) capable of carrying troops and all their equipment and supplies and all the other things needed for a successful invasion. Just any old ship wouldn&rsquot do amphibious operations required a special type of ship. These transport and cargo ships needed to be able to load and unload all their troops and all the troop&rsquos equipment using only their own boats and their own crew members as stevedores, thus giving birth to the Attack Transports (APAs) and Attack Cargo Ships (AKAs). Later, LSTs (Landing Ship Tanks) and LCIs (Landing Craft Infantry) were added to the mix. Warships could shell enemy positions and warplanes could bomb enemy positions, but in the Pacific theater it took ground troops (Army or Marines), carried there by APAs and AKAs, to finish the job. Although, such sailors never received the recognition and glory given the &ldquoGlamour Ships&rdquo, they wore their Bell Bottom Trousers with just as much pride and luster as their comrades who served on the warships.

Attack Transport: USS Charles Carroll in World War II

In November 1942, the amphibious transport ship USS Charles Carroll carried troops from Norfolk to invade North Africa. In 1945 it was transferred to the Pacific for the invasion of Okinawa. In between, the "Lucky Chuck," as the ship was fondly known, participated in the invasions of Sicily, Salerno, Normandy, and southern France. Attack Transport tells the service history of USS Charles Carroll (APA-28 which earned six battle stars during WWII.

Kenneth Goldman's father, Lt. Robert W. Goldman, USNR, was aboard ship for five of her six battle operations. As a junior officer (he eventually became the ship's navigator), he held a high security clearance and saved a large portion of the documents to which he was privy. These invasion maps, photographs, ship's plans of the day, convoy position orders, enemy force assessments, and more form the backbone of Attack Transport.

Yet Goldman graciously keeps his father out of center stage in telling the "life" of a ship that participated in almost all of the major U.S. amphibious assaults in the European Theater. Using weathered diaries and letters from other crew members, along with their memories of service, he captures the humor, boredom, combat fears, and capers on liberty that give this view from the lower deck a charm that operational histories do not have.

"Offers a cascade of authentic information and 'flavor' on going to sea that I recognize as quite authentic from my own experiences and gives rare insights into wartime naval service of a ship type not usually covered in the spate of 'war as I knew it' memoir. The shipboard routine reveals itself in gritty and authentic prose." &ndash Kenneth W. Estes, author of Marine Officer's Guide

"Fills a marked gap in our knowledge of the period namely an up close and personal view of the brave men and gallant ships handling the various D-Days." &ndash William O. Oldson, Director, Institute on World War II and the Human Experience, Florida State University


Bladen APA-63 - History

Transportation and communications were key factors in the settlement and growth of Bladen County. In the early days of settlement, rivers were the only effective means of transporting goods to any extent therefore the settlers occupied the lands along the Cape Fear River and the South River. The Cape Fear, a much larger river, attracted more of the early folks, yet along both rivers homes were built and plantations were developed.

Attempts were made in 1732 and 1733 to break away from New Hanover County, but Bladen County finally became its own entity on November 11, 1734, encompassing a very large area that was later broken into scores of other counties. In 1738, the first courthouse was built in Elizabeth, about three miles upriver from the present-day town and county seat of Elizabethtown.

In 1748, the people of the Pee Dee area petitioned for a new county, Anson, be formed since Elizabeth was over 100 miles away. Anson County was formed out of Bladen County in 1750. In 1752, another slice was taken to form Orange County.

Although Bladen County was sparsely settled at the outbreak of the Revolutionary War, records indicate that 300 men of the Bladen Militia were in service when Fort Johnston, at the mouth of the Cape Fear river in Brunswick County, was captured by the Colonials in 1776. They witnessed the departure of the last Royal Governor, Josiah Martin, when he found refuge aboard a British vessel there.

In 1786, Robeson County was created out of Bladen County, and in 1788 the Great Swamp area was added to Robeson County. So great a slice was taken by Robeson County, it is often called the "State of Robeson."

Chaotic conditions existed throughout the country after the Revolutionary War, and it was some time before order was obtained and definite policies were formed by the new country. The people of Bladen County were solely focused on making a living, which included the production of turpentine, pitch, tar, staves, headings, shingles, and lumber. These products were shipped down the Cape Fear River to Wilmington. These were the primary products of the county well up to the Civil War era.

Bladen County contributed its share of men to the State's cause during the Civil War. Companies of over 100 men were formed in April, 1861, before North Carolina officially seceded from the Union. These Bladen County Companies served in all theatres of the war, from start to finish.

Railroads came to Bladen County in 1863 with a major stop at Abbottsburg, settled by Joseph C. Abbotts. He established a large lumber business there, and almost immediately the town became the largest in Bladen County. After the railroad came through, other towns grew along its line. Very soon, Clarkton, Bladenboro, and Council grew and the surrounding areas developed rapidly.

The first road improvement initative came in 1908 in Brown Marsh Township. By 1919, all other townships had issued bonds and started a large road building campaign. This opened up Bladen County to all of its people.


Access options

Buy single article

Instant access to the full article PDF.

Tax calculation will be finalised during checkout.

Subscribe to journal

Immediate online access to all issues from 2019. Subscription will auto renew annually.

Tax calculation will be finalised during checkout.


Bladen County in the 1700s

by Jason Bordeaux, 2010.

Reprinted with permission from Bladen County NCGenWeb.

Attempts were made in 1732 in the General Assembly to provide two new precincts, Onslow and Bladen, from the larger precinct of New Hanover. Bladen Precinct was erected on 31 October, 1732, but at this time, a controversy arose over constitutional authority to erect new precincts. Further attempts made in 1733 were also unsuccessful. When the matter was brought before the Council in Edenton, it was again refused. The Council stated that “in Bladen there are not over three freeholders, Nathaniel Moore, Thomas Jones, and Richard Singletary, and not over 30 families, including these freeholders”. The proposal, however, was finally passed and Bladen Precinct was officially recognized on 11 November, 1734. All precincts were re-labeled as counties in 1739.

The bounds of the original Bladen Precinct were described as follows: “Beginning at the mouth of Livingstone’s Creek and bounded by the said creek to the head thereof then by a line West, to the bounds of government and that the said precinct be bounded to the Northward by Black River, as follows viz, beginning at the mouth of said river, and bounded by the Main River up to the fork, and that then the Westermost Branch to be the bounds to the head thereof.”

Bladen was named in honor of Martin Bladen (1680 – 1746), Lord Commissioner of Trade and Plantation.

What little is known of the Native Americans living in the area was described by James Sprunt in Chronicles of the Cape Fear River 1660-1916: “In reference to the Woccon, Saxapahaw (Sissipahaw), Cape Fear, and Warrennuncock Indians, we find it stated: Of the NC tribes bearing the foregoing names almost nothing is known, and of the last two even the proper names have not been recorded. The Woccon were Siouan the Saxapahaw and Cape Fear Indians presumably were Siouan, as indicated from their associations and alliance with known Siouan tribes while the Warrennuncock were probably some people better known under another name, although they cannot be identified. Unfortunately the identity of the Cape Fear Indians has not been revealed, and it may ever remain a mystery. The name was first bestowed, by the early colonists, upon the Indians who they found occupying the lands about the mouth of the Cape Fear River, and more especially the peninsula now forming the southern part of New Hanover County. It is also possible the term “Cape Fear Indians” was applied to any Indians found in the vicinity, regardless of their tribal connections. The area was frequented by numbers of different tribes."

An excerpt by S. A. Ashe within James Sprunt’s book states the following: “The Indians on the lower Cape Fear are said to have been Congarees, a branch of the Old Cheraws. Soon after the settlement, they were driven away. In 1733, Governor Burrington mentioned that the small tribes that had resided near the settlements had entirely disappeared.”

The modes of transportation and communication were determining factors in the settlement, growth, and development of Bladen County. In the days of the settlement of the county, rivers were the only means of transporting goods to any great extent therefore, the settlers occupied the lands along the Cape Fear River and South River. The Cape Fear, a much larger river, attracted more of the early settlers, yet along both rivers homes were built and plantations were developed. It was said that those who lived quite some distance from the rivers lived in the “backwoods”.

Lawrence Lee described the progress of settlement in The Lower Cape Fear in Colonial Days: “As late as the winter of 1724-25, according to General Burrington who was there, the Cape Fear region was uninhabited. Sometime between then and the spring of 1726, the settlement had begun. The earliest known resident was Maurice Moore, who was there on 30 April, 1726. It is unlikely that Moore was there alone, but the number and identity of his neighbors are not known. By the end of June, 1726, Moore had laid out Brunswick Town in the new settlement and had sold the first Lot.”

“Because many of the small groups were related by blood or marriage, they became known as the family. In addition to Maurice and Roger Moore and their brother, Nathaniel, the recipients readily identified as members of the group were Eleazar Allen, John Porter, Edward Moseley, John Baptista Ashe, Samuel Swann, John Swann, John Davis, John Grange, Edward Hyrne, Thomas Jones, Edward Smith, and Mosely Vail.”

The earliest recorded land grants were made under the Lords Proprietors in 1727. David Donahoe and John Baptista Ashe received grants in 1727. Richard Singletary received a grant in 1728.

The first homogeneous community in the county was the Quakers according to Stephen B. Weeks, writing in Southern Quakers and Slavery. "The earliest of these meetings in NC seems to have been that at Carver’s Creek in Bladen County. It was named from the founder of the settlement, James Carver, who moved from Pennsylvania. It was begun about 1740, and asked for a Monthly Meeting as early as 1743 in 1746 one had been settled. It belonged to the Eastern Quarter. From 1749 through 1752 some of the families represented are Carver, Clark, Clayton, Benbow, Beals, Ballinger, Chamness, Cox, Kemp, Mayer, Mathews, Sommers, and Wright. Most were from Fairfax Monthly Meeting, Virginia, but others came from Pennsylvania. The meeting continued until about 1797 when some of the members went west and others went to Guilford and Randolph Counties.” Although a majority of the Quakers left Bladen County, some of them remained including Isaac Jones, Hugh McAden, James Seames/Sims, George Brown, Neal Shaw, Duncan McCoulskey, Griffith Jones, and the families of Raynor, Baldwin, Granger, Roan/Rowan, Anderson, and Lewis.

Gabriel Johnston, who became Royal Governor in 1734, persuaded Highlanders from his native Scotland to come and settle in North Carolina. Several Highlanders came in the early 1730?s. Alexander Clark brought several immigrants in 1736 from the Isle of Jura, Argyll County, Scotland. These men had suffered religious persecution and they were seeking freedom. Dougald McNeill and Colonel McAllister brought another 350 Scotsmen in 1739. In 1767 a ship load of immigrants sailed from the Isle of Jura and arrived in Brunswick on the Cape Fear below Wilmington. Surnames included Clark, McDougald, McLean, Buie, Russ, and Campbell. On 4 April, 1804, the immigrant ship, Minerva, arrived in Wilmington from Greenock, Scotland including Scotsmen with surnames Clark, Sinclair, McBride, Livingston, McGregor, Buchanan, Graham, McLaughlin, and Johnson. Many of the Scotsmen settled in what became Cumberland and Robeson Counties.

Old Bladen County was home to many of the ancestral families of the Lumbee Indian Tribe of NC. They were found on the tax lists and census records variously listed as whites, mulattoes, and mixed bloods. Bound together by a common ancestry, they have survived to this day as a unified group. Their mark has been indelibly stamped on North Carolina’s history. A 1773 petition records the surnames of several members of this community: Ivey, Sweat, Chavers, Dees, Groom, Grant, Vann, Lockelear, and Cairsey.

The General Assembly passed a statute in 1723 requiring that wives and other females in households of free persons of color should be taxable. The policy originated as a result of so many mixed blood people who were moving into the colony and intermarrying with whites. Inter-racial marriages were forbidden by an earlier statute passed in 1715. There is an abundance of evidence available in the records to show that settlers and slaves formed unions and had children. These children and subsequent generations became free persons of color.

Between 1790 and 1800 a number of Sampson and New Hanover County residents from the Coharie Section moved across South River into Bladen County. It was during this era that the State of North Carolina issued many land grants, particularly to Revolutionary War veterans and their families. Research indicates that a number of families made this sojourn, and appear in the 1800 Federal Census of Bladen County.

The harbor at Wilmington and the coast of NC in general was very difficult to navigate in the 18th century. While Bladen was settled by a few immigrants coming into Wilmington, the vast majority of the settlers came from various locations in the colonies at the time. As indicated in North Carolina Through Four Centuries by William S. Powell, “North Carolina had permanent settlers at a later date than most of the other colonies, and it came to be regarded as a frontier region open to settlement by people from Virginia and South Carolina particularly, but also from Maryland, Pennsylvania, and New Jersey. Others arrived from the crowded cities of England and Northern Ireland, from the highlands and lowlands of Scotland, and from the valleys of the Rhine and the Danube rivers in central Europe.”

Bladen’s first courthouse was erected on the west bank of the North West Branch of the Cape Fear River about 50 miles above the forks and about 3.5 miles from present day Elizabethtown. The location is now known as Courthouse Landing.

The earliest available list of inhabitants for Bladen County is the tax list of 1763. At that time, Bladen included portions of present day Brunswick, Columbus, Hoke, and Robeson Counties. The tax list gives a total of 490 entries with 1,244 taxables. This can be broken down into 577 white taxables and 667 black taxables (376 black males and 291 black females). Given an average family size of about 6, the 1763 population can be estimated to be around 5,000.

The federal census of 1790 gave the total population of Bladen as 5,206. This can be broken down into 837 free white males over 16 years of age, and 830 under 16 years of age 1,863 white females 1,676 slaves. Note that Cumberland and Robeson Counties had already been carved from Bladen at this time. Due to the formation of other counties, Bladen was only about half the size it was in 1763.

References and additional information:

Bladen County Bicentennial Commission. 1970. 1763 tax list of Bladen County, North Carolina. Elizabethtown, N.C.: Bladen County Bicentennial Commission.

Bladen County Heritage Book Committee. 1999. Bladen County heritage, North Carolina, Vol. 1. Waynesville, N.C.: Bladen County Heritage Book Committee and County Heritage.

Crawford, C. E. 1987. A history of Bladen County North Carolina. Elizabethtown, N.C.: Bladen County Historical Society.

Little, Ann Ward. 1980. Columbus County, North Carolina, recollections and records. Whiteville, N.C.: Columbus County Commissioners and Columbus County Public Library.

Powell, William Stevens. 1989. North Carolina through four centuries. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press.

Image credit:

"North Carolina at the beginning of 1740." From the North Carolina State Archives, Raleigh, NC, USA .


Watch the video: The Story of Avatar Wan Origins of the First Avatar. LOK (June 2022).


Comments:

  1. Hadwyn

    Yes indeed. It was with me too. Let's discuss this issue. Here or at PM.

  2. Blaisdell

    I can recommend that you visit the site with a huge amount of information on the topic that interests you.

  3. Akinojas

    I will not speak on this topic.

  4. Teiljo

    I congratulate, this idea is necessary just by the way



Write a message